Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis

by Jeremy Brown, PhD, Peter Delves, PhD, Pravin Shukle, MD u.a.
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Tuberculosis is one of the granulomatous infecious diseases caused by mycobacterium tuberculosis.

It is an airborne infection that affects the lungs but can spread to the whole body organs. Chronic inflammation, granuloma formation and fibrosis are the main pathology of tuberculosis.

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Course Details

  • Videos 6
  • Duration 1:14 h
  • Quiz questions 12
  • Topic reviews 3

Content

Your Educators of course Tuberculosis

 Jeremy Brown, PhD

Jeremy Brown, PhD

Professor Jeremy Brown is a clinician scientist with an interest in respiratory infection. He studied medicine in London, graduating with honors, and continued his postgraduate medical training in a variety of London hospitals.
He completed his PhD in molecular microbiology in 1999 and obtained a prestigious Welcome Advanced Research Fellowship for further scientific training at the University of Adelaide. His research is mainly focused on respiratory complications of haematological disease and stem cell transplantation.
His educational and scientific experience enables him to teach students and professionals about respiratory medicine.

 Peter Delves, PhD

Peter Delves, PhD

Peter Delves, Professor Emeritus of Immunology and former Vice Dean (Education) of the Faculty of Medical Sciences at University College London, is not only editor of two encyclopedias but also author of several textbooks and laboratory manuals. His special interest lies in improving an understanding of immunology through both web-based education and face-to-face interaction.
 Pravin Shukle, MD

Pravin Shukle, MD

Dr. Shukle is a board certified specialist in internal medicine. He runs one of the largest specialty practices in Ontario, Canada. His area of interest is the stroke and heart attack reduction in high risk patients.

He owns and runs a full functioning cardiac and diabetes suite that includes diagnostics, diet counseling, exercise counseling, and lifestyle support for patients with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and arrhythmia. He is one of Canada’s most popular speakers. He performs over 150 special lectures across the nation each year with various audiences ranging from the general public, to nurses, to physicians, to medical specialists. His lectures are engaging, funny, and informative. In 2016, Dr. Shukle will be conducting a TED talk on using DNA as a memory storage medium.

 Brian Alverson, MD

Brian Alverson, MD

Brian Alverson, MD is the Director for the Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine at Hasbro Children's Hospital and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Brown University in Providence, RI. He has been active in pediatric education and research for 15 years.He has won over 25 teaching awards at two Ivy League Medical Schools. He is an author of the book "Step Up to Pediatrics" and over 40 peer reviewed articles. Dr. Alverson has extensive experience in preparing students for the USMLE exams and has test writing experience as well.


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TB lectures need improvement
By Hamed S. on 27. March 2017 for Influenza A and Tuberculosis

The TB lectures can be improved, In particular the approach to dx of a pt with suspected TB and in particular when you would consider tissue biopsy. Also the approach to dx of latent tb isn't clear. E,g performing a chest x-ray in high risk patient populations followed by mantoux testing. No mention of what size reaction is considered positive in different population ie immunosuppressed healthcare workers and the general population. The lecture discusses the treatment of active tb but no discussion of treating latent TB. No mention of when you would treat contacts of the index case. Finally serious side effects of TB treatment were not adequately covered. Isoniazid (need for B6 to decrease risk of peripheral neuropathy and megaloblastic anaemia) rifampicin and liver toxicity and drug interactions, ethambutol and occular toxicities and need for monitoring of visual fields and pyrazinamide (hepatoxicity).