Cytomegalovirus

CMV is a ubiquitous double-stranded DNA DNA The molecule DNA is the repository of heritable genetic information. In humans, DNA is contained in 23 chromosome pairs within the nucleus. The molecule provides the basic template for replication of genetic information, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis to promote cellular function and survival. DNA Types and Structure virus Virus Viruses are infectious, obligate intracellular parasites composed of a nucleic acid core surrounded by a protein capsid. Viruses can be either naked (non-enveloped) or enveloped. The classification of viruses is complex and based on many factors, including type and structure of the nucleoid and capsid, the presence of an envelope, the replication cycle, and the host range. Virology: Overview belonging to the Herpesviridae family. CMV infections can be transmitted in bodily fluids, such as blood, saliva, urine, semen, and breast milk. The initial infection is usually asymptomatic in the immunocompetent host, or it can present with symptoms of mononucleosis Mononucleosis Infectious mononucleosis (IM), also known as "the kissing disease," is a highly contagious viral infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. Its common name is derived from its main method of transmission: the spread of infected saliva via kissing. Clinical manifestations of IM include fever, tonsillar pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy. Mononucleosis. After the primary infection, the virus Virus Viruses are infectious, obligate intracellular parasites composed of a nucleic acid core surrounded by a protein capsid. Viruses can be either naked (non-enveloped) or enveloped. The classification of viruses is complex and based on many factors, including type and structure of the nucleoid and capsid, the presence of an envelope, the replication cycle, and the host range. Virology: Overview becomes latent. Reactivation can occur in immunocompromised individuals, leading to conditions such as CMV esophagitis Esophagitis Esophagitis is the inflammation or irritation of the esophagus. The major types of esophagitis are medication-induced, infectious, eosinophilic, corrosive, and acid reflux. Patients typically present with odynophagia, dysphagia, and retrosternal chest pain. Esophagitis, colitis, hepatitis, retinitis, encephalitis Encephalitis Encephalitis is inflammation of the brain parenchyma caused by an infection, usually viral. Encephalitis may present with mild symptoms such as headache, fever, fatigue, and muscle and joint pain or with severe symptoms such as seizures, altered consciousness, and paralysis. Encephalitis, and pneumonia Pneumonia Pneumonia or pulmonary inflammation is an acute or chronic inflammation of lung tissue. Causes include infection with bacteria, viruses, or fungi. In more rare cases, pneumonia can also be caused through toxic triggers through inhalation of toxic substances, immunological processes, or in the course of radiotherapy. Pneumonia.

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Classification

Dna virus classification flowchart

Identification of DNA DNA The molecule DNA is the repository of heritable genetic information. In humans, DNA is contained in 23 chromosome pairs within the nucleus. The molecule provides the basic template for replication of genetic information, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis to promote cellular function and survival. DNA Types and Structure viruses:
Viruses can be classified in many ways. Most viruses, however, will have a genome formed by either DNA DNA The molecule DNA is the repository of heritable genetic information. In humans, DNA is contained in 23 chromosome pairs within the nucleus. The molecule provides the basic template for replication of genetic information, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis to promote cellular function and survival. DNA Types and Structure or RNA RNA Ribonucleic acid (RNA), like deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), is a polymer of nucleotides that is essential to cellular protein synthesis. Unlike DNA, RNA is a single-stranded structure containing the sugar moiety ribose (instead of deoxyribose) and the base uracil (instead of thymine). RNA generally carries out the instructions encoded in the DNA but also executes diverse non-coding functions. RNA Types and Structure. Viruses with a DNA DNA The molecule DNA is the repository of heritable genetic information. In humans, DNA is contained in 23 chromosome pairs within the nucleus. The molecule provides the basic template for replication of genetic information, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis to promote cellular function and survival. DNA Types and Structure genome can be further characterized as single or double stranded. “Enveloped” viruses are covered by a thin coat of cell membrane Cell Membrane A cell membrane (also known as the plasma membrane or plasmalemma) is a biological membrane that separates the cell contents from the outside environment. A cell membrane is composed of a phospholipid bilayer and proteins that function to protect cellular DNA and mediate the exchange of ions and molecules. The Cell: Cell Membrane, which is usually taken from the host cell. If the coat is absent, however, the viruses are called “naked” viruses. Some enveloped viruses translate DNA DNA The molecule DNA is the repository of heritable genetic information. In humans, DNA is contained in 23 chromosome pairs within the nucleus. The molecule provides the basic template for replication of genetic information, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis to promote cellular function and survival. DNA Types and Structure into RNA RNA Ribonucleic acid (RNA), like deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), is a polymer of nucleotides that is essential to cellular protein synthesis. Unlike DNA, RNA is a single-stranded structure containing the sugar moiety ribose (instead of deoxyribose) and the base uracil (instead of thymine). RNA generally carries out the instructions encoded in the DNA but also executes diverse non-coding functions. RNA Types and Structure before incorporating into the genome of the host cell.

Image by Lecturio. License: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

General Characteristics and Epidemiology

Basic features of CMV

  • Also known as HHV-5
  • Taxonomy:
    • Family: Herpesviridae
    • Subfamily: Betaherpesvirinae
    • Genus:  Cytomegalovirus
  • DNA DNA The molecule DNA is the repository of heritable genetic information. In humans, DNA is contained in 23 chromosome pairs within the nucleus. The molecule provides the basic template for replication of genetic information, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis to promote cellular function and survival. DNA Types and Structure virus Virus Viruses are infectious, obligate intracellular parasites composed of a nucleic acid core surrounded by a protein capsid. Viruses can be either naked (non-enveloped) or enveloped. The classification of viruses is complex and based on many factors, including type and structure of the nucleoid and capsid, the presence of an envelope, the replication cycle, and the host range. Virology: Overview:
    • Double-stranded
    • Linear
  • Structure:
    • DNA DNA The molecule DNA is the repository of heritable genetic information. In humans, DNA is contained in 23 chromosome pairs within the nucleus. The molecule provides the basic template for replication of genetic information, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis to promote cellular function and survival. DNA Types and Structure core
    • Icosahedral nucleocapsid
    • Tegument
    • Phospholipid envelope with glycoprotein spikes

Epidemiology

  • Approximately 60%–90% of adults have CMV antibodies Antibodies Immunoglobulins (Igs), also known as antibodies, are glycoprotein molecules produced by plasma cells that act in immune responses by recognizing and binding particular antigens. The various Ig classes are IgG (the most abundant), IgM, IgE, IgD, and IgA, which differ in their biologic features, structure, target specificity, and distribution. Immunoglobulins (lifelong latent infection).
  • Prevalence increases with age.
  • Ethnicity: higher prevalence in non-Hispanic Black Americans and Mexican Americans
  • Higher positivity rates also associated with:
    • Female sex
    • Birthplace outside the United States
    • Low household income and education
    • Household crowding

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Pathogenesis

Reservoir

The CMV strain associated with human infection is found only in humans.

Transmission

  • Contact with infected bodily fluids 
  • Sexual contact
  • Blood transfusion
  • Organ transplantation Organ Transplantation Transplantation is a procedure that involves the removal of an organ or living tissue and placing it into a different part of the body or into a different person. Organ transplantations have become the therapeutic option of choice for many individuals with end-stage organ failure. Organ Transplantation
  • Perinatal
    • In utero (during maternal viremia)
    • During birth (from contact with vaginal secretions)
    • Breast milk 
  • Occupational exposure

Host risk factors

Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality from CMV.

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Transplant patients

Viral replication cycle

  • Viral glycoproteins attach to host cell receptors → endocytosis or fusion with cell membrane Cell Membrane A cell membrane (also known as the plasma membrane or plasmalemma) is a biological membrane that separates the cell contents from the outside environment. A cell membrane is composed of a phospholipid bilayer and proteins that function to protect cellular DNA and mediate the exchange of ions and molecules. The Cell: Cell Membrane (unclear)
  • Capsid transported to the nuclear pore → DNA DNA The molecule DNA is the repository of heritable genetic information. In humans, DNA is contained in 23 chromosome pairs within the nucleus. The molecule provides the basic template for replication of genetic information, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis to promote cellular function and survival. DNA Types and Structure released into the nucleus
  • Transcription Transcription Transcription of genetic information is the first step in gene expression. Transcription is the process by which DNA is used as a template to make mRNA. This process is divided into 3 stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Stages of Transcription and replication → viral assembly
  • Budding through the nuclear membrane → assembly with tegument proteins 
  • Acquires envelope → released from cell

Pathophysiology

Pathogenesis cytomegalovirus

Pathogenesis of CMV

Image by Lecturio. License: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
  • Virus infects oral epithelial cells → viral replication → cytomegalic cells with owl’s eye nuclear inclusions
  • Cell-mediated response ensues (most important for controlling CMV infection) → virus Virus Viruses are infectious, obligate intracellular parasites composed of a nucleic acid core surrounded by a protein capsid. Viruses can be either naked (non-enveloped) or enveloped. The classification of viruses is complex and based on many factors, including type and structure of the nucleoid and capsid, the presence of an envelope, the replication cycle, and the host range. Virology: Overview become latent in:
    • Myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow Bone marrow Bone marrow, the primary site of hematopoiesis, is found in the cavities of cancellous bones and the medullary canals of long bones. There are 2 types: red marrow (hematopoietic with abundant blood cells) and yellow marrow (predominantly filled with adipocytes). Composition of Bone Marrow
    • Monocytes
    • Macrophages
    • Lymphocytes Lymphocytes Lymphocytes are heterogeneous WBCs involved in immune response. Lymphocytes develop from the bone marrow, starting from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progressing to common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). B and T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells arise from the lineage. Lymphocytes
  • Immunocompromised state → reactivation can occur → viremia → clinical manifestations

Pathology

Cells infected with CMV will:

  • Enlarge
  • Contain viral inclusion bodies (owl’s eye).

Diseases caused by CMV

The spectrum of clinical presentations with CMV is diverse and depends on the immune status of the host.

CMV mononucleosis Mononucleosis Infectious mononucleosis (IM), also known as "the kissing disease," is a highly contagious viral infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. Its common name is derived from its main method of transmission: the spread of infected saliva via kissing. Clinical manifestations of IM include fever, tonsillar pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy. Mononucleosis

Most immunocompetent patients will be asymptomatic. In the minority who are symptomatic, the most common presentation is a syndrome similar to infectious mononucleosis Mononucleosis Infectious mononucleosis (IM), also known as "the kissing disease," is a highly contagious viral infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. Its common name is derived from its main method of transmission: the spread of infected saliva via kissing. Clinical manifestations of IM include fever, tonsillar pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy. Mononucleosis (EBV).

  • Clinical presentation:
    • Fever
    • Malaise
    • Headache
    • Myalgias and arthralgias
    • Erythematous, maculopapular rash in patients exposed to beta-lactam antibiotics
    • Less common:
      • Pharyngitis
      • Lymphadenopathy Lymphadenopathy Lymphadenopathy is lymph node enlargement (> 1 cm) and is benign and self-limited in most patients. Etiologies include malignancy, infection, and autoimmune disorders, as well as iatrogenic causes such as the use of certain medications. Generalized lymphadenopathy often indicates underlying systemic disease. Lymphadenopathy
      • Hepatosplenomegaly
  • Diagnosis:
    • Lymphocytosis Lymphocytosis WBCs develop from stem cells in the bone marrow and are called leukocytes when circulating in the bloodstream. Lymphocytes are 1 of the 5 subclasses of WBCs. Lymphocytosis is an increase in the number or proportion of the lymphocyte subclass of WBCs, often as a result of an immune response to infection (known as reactive lymphocytosis). Lymphocytosis with atypical lymphocytes
    • Negative heterophile (monospot test)
    • Serology for CMV antibodies Antibodies Immunoglobulins (Igs), also known as antibodies, are glycoprotein molecules produced by plasma cells that act in immune responses by recognizing and binding particular antigens. The various Ig classes are IgG (the most abundant), IgM, IgE, IgD, and IgA, which differ in their biologic features, structure, target specificity, and distribution. Immunoglobulins
    • PCR for CMV DNA DNA The molecule DNA is the repository of heritable genetic information. In humans, DNA is contained in 23 chromosome pairs within the nucleus. The molecule provides the basic template for replication of genetic information, RNA transcription, and protein biosynthesis to promote cellular function and survival. DNA Types and Structure
  • Management: Most cases are self-limited and do not require antiviral therapy.

Congenital CMV

Congenital CMV is one of the perinatal TORCH (toxoplasmosis, other agents, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex) infections.

  • Most infants with congenital CMV infection are asymptomatic at birth.
  • Symptomatic infants present with:
    • Petechial rash
    • Chorioretinitis Chorioretinitis Chorioretinitis is the inflammation of the posterior segment of the eye, including the choroid and the retina. The condition is usually caused by infections, the most common of which is toxoplasmosis. Some of these infections can affect the fetus in utero and present as congenital abnormalities. Chorioretinitis
    • Jaundice Jaundice Jaundice is the abnormal yellowing of the skin and/or sclera caused by the accumulation of bilirubin. Hyperbilirubinemia is caused by either an increase in bilirubin production or a decrease in the hepatic uptake, conjugation, or excretion of bilirubin. Jaundice
    • Hepatosplenomegaly
    • Intrauterine growth restriction
    • Microcephaly
    • Hypotonia
    • Sensorineural hearing loss Hearing loss Hearing loss, also known as hearing impairment, is any degree of impairment in the ability to apprehend sound as determined by audiometry to be below normal hearing thresholds. Clinical presentation may occur at birth or as a gradual loss of hearing with age, including a short-term or sudden loss at any point. Hearing Loss
Cytomegalovirus infection

MRI of an infant with congenital Cytomegalovirus demonstrating periventricular calcifications, ventriculomegaly, and cerebellar hypoplasia

Image: “Axial computed tomography (CT) image” by Department of Neurology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD USA. License: CC BY 4.0

Opportunistic infections

The following are rare in immunocompetent hosts and are often the result of reactivation of a latent infection. Note: Infections outside the lymph nodes, spleen Spleen The spleen is the largest lymphoid organ in the body, located in the LUQ of the abdomen, superior to the left kidney and posterior to the stomach at the level of the 9th-11th ribs just below the diaphragm. The spleen is highly vascular and acts as an important blood filter, cleansing the blood of pathogens and damaged erythrocytes. Spleen, and liver Liver The liver is the largest gland in the human body. The liver is found in the superior right quadrant of the abdomen and weighs approximately 1.5 kilograms. Its main functions are detoxification, metabolism, nutrient storage (e.g., iron and vitamins), synthesis of coagulation factors, formation of bile, filtration, and storage of blood. Liver are considered AIDS-defining conditions AIDS-defining conditions Chronic HIV infection and depletion of CD4 cells eventually results in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which can be diagnosed by the presence of certain opportunistic diseases called AIDS-defining conditions. These conditions include a wide spectrum of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections as well as several malignancies and generalized conditions. AIDS-defining Conditions

  • GI manifestations:
    • Esophagitis
    • Colitis
    • Hepatitis
    • Pancreatitis
  • Neurologic manifestations:
    • Encephalitis
    • Guillain-Barré syndrome Guillain-Barré syndrome Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), once thought to be a single disease process, is a family of immune-mediated polyneuropathies that occur after infections (e.g., with Campylobacter jejuni). Guillain-Barré Syndrome
  • Ocular manifestations: 
    • Retinitis
  • Cardiopulmonary manifestations:
    • Pneumonia
    • Pericarditis Pericarditis Pericarditis is an inflammation of the pericardium, often with fluid accumulation. It can be caused by infection (often viral), myocardial infarction, drugs, malignancies, metabolic disorders, autoimmune disorders, or trauma. Acute, subacute, and chronic forms exist. Pericarditis
    • Myocarditis Myocarditis Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium, which may occur alone or in association with a systemic process. There are numerous etiologies of myocarditis, but all lead to inflammation and myocyte injury, most often leading to signs and symptoms of heart failure. Myocarditis
Cmv retinitis

Fundoscopic image of CMV retinitis

Image: “Fundus photograph-CMV retinitis” by National Eye Institute. License: Public Domain

Comparison of Herpesviruses

The following table compares the 9 herpesviruses considered endemic in humans; there are 115 known species of herpesviruses, grouped into 3 families: 

  • Alpha (infect epithelial cells and produce latent infection in postmitotic neurons)
  • Beta (infect and produce latent infection in a variety of cell types)
  • Gamma (produce latent infection mainly in lymphoid cells)
Table: Comparison of the 9 herpesviruses considered endemic in humans
HHV Common name Primary target cells Latency site Clinical presentation*
1
(alpha group)
HSV HSV Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a double-stranded DNA virus belonging to the family Herpesviridae. Herpes simplex virus commonly causes recurrent infections involving the skin and mucosal surfaces, including the mouth, lips, eyes, and genitals. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 & 2-1 Mucoepithelial cells Dorsal root ganglia
  • Gingivostomatitis
  • Keratitis
  • Herpetic whitlow
  • Encephalitis
  • Hepatitis
  • Esophagitis
  • Pneumonitis
2
(alpha group)
HSV HSV Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a double-stranded DNA virus belonging to the family Herpesviridae. Herpes simplex virus commonly causes recurrent infections involving the skin and mucosal surfaces, including the mouth, lips, eyes, and genitals. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 & 2-2
  • Genital herpes Genital Herpes Genital herpes infections are common sexually transmitted infections caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or 2. Primary infection often presents with systemic, prodromal symptoms followed by clusters of painful, fluid-filled vesicles on an erythematous base, dysuria, and painful lymphadenopathy. Labial and Genital Herpes
  • Meningitis Meningitis Meningitis is inflammation of the meninges, the protective membranes of the brain, and spinal cord. The causes of meningitis are varied, with the most common being bacterial or viral infection. The classic presentation of meningitis is a triad of fever, altered mental status, and nuchal rigidity. Meningitis
  • Proctitis
3
(alpha group)
VZV
  • Chickenpox Chickenpox Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a linear, double-stranded DNA virus in the Herpesviridae family. Chickenpox is the primary infection and occurs most commonly in children. The typical clinical presentation includes prodromal symptoms and a generalized, intensely pruritic vesicular rash. Varicella-Zoster Virus/Chickenpox
  • Herpes zoster Herpes Zoster Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a linear, double-stranded DNA virus in the Herpesviridae family. Shingles (also known as herpes zoster) is more common in adults and occurs due to the reactivation of VZV. Varicella-Zoster Virus/Chickenpox
4
(gamma group)
EBV Epithelial cells B cells B cells B lymphocytes, also known as B cells, are important components of the adaptive immune system. In the bone marrow, the hematopoietic stem cells go through a series of steps to become mature naive B cells. The cells migrate to secondary lymphoid organs for activation and further maturation. B Cells Memory B cells B cells B lymphocytes, also known as B cells, are important components of the adaptive immune system. In the bone marrow, the hematopoietic stem cells go through a series of steps to become mature naive B cells. The cells migrate to secondary lymphoid organs for activation and further maturation. B Cells
  • Infectious mononucleosis Mononucleosis Infectious mononucleosis (IM), also known as "the kissing disease," is a highly contagious viral infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. Its common name is derived from its main method of transmission: the spread of infected saliva via kissing. Clinical manifestations of IM include fever, tonsillar pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy. Mononucleosis
  • Hodgkin lymphoma Hodgkin lymphoma Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of B lymphocytes originating in the lymph nodes. The pathognomonic histologic finding of HL is a Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cell (giant multinucleated B cells with eosinophilic inclusions). The disease presents most commonly with lymphadenopathy, night sweats, weight loss, fever, splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. Hodgkin Lymphoma
  • Burkitt lymphoma
  • Oral hairy leukoplakia Leukoplakia Leukoplakia is a potentially malignant lesion affecting the squamous epithelium usually within the oral cavity. Leukoplakia can be associated with a history of chronic tobacco and alcohol use, both of which can synergistically damage the epithelium. Leukoplakia
  • EBV-associated gastric cancer Gastric cancer Gastric cancer is the 3rd-most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The majority of cases are from adenocarcinoma. The modifiable risk factors include Helicobacter pylori infection, smoking, and nitrate-rich diets. Gastric Cancer
5
(beta group)
CMV
  • Monocytes
  • Lymphocytes Lymphocytes Lymphocytes are heterogeneous WBCs involved in immune response. Lymphocytes develop from the bone marrow, starting from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progressing to common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). B and T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells arise from the lineage. Lymphocytes
  • Epithelial cells
Hematopoietic progenitor cells in bone marrow Bone marrow Bone marrow, the primary site of hematopoiesis, is found in the cavities of cancellous bones and the medullary canals of long bones. There are 2 types: red marrow (hematopoietic with abundant blood cells) and yellow marrow (predominantly filled with adipocytes). Composition of Bone Marrow
  • CMV mononucleosis Mononucleosis Infectious mononucleosis (IM), also known as "the kissing disease," is a highly contagious viral infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. Its common name is derived from its main method of transmission: the spread of infected saliva via kissing. Clinical manifestations of IM include fever, tonsillar pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy. Mononucleosis
  • CMV retinitis
  • CMV colitis
  • CMV encephalitis Encephalitis Encephalitis is inflammation of the brain parenchyma caused by an infection, usually viral. Encephalitis may present with mild symptoms such as headache, fever, fatigue, and muscle and joint pain or with severe symptoms such as seizures, altered consciousness, and paralysis. Encephalitis
6A, 6B
(beta group)
HHV-6 HHV-6 Human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 and HHV-7 are similar double-stranded DNA viruses belonging to the Herpesviridae family. Human herpesviruses are ubiquitous and infections are commonly contracted during childhood. Human Herpesvirus 6 & 7 T cells T cells T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are important components of the adaptive immune system. Production starts from the hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, from which T-cell progenitor cells arise. These cells migrate to the thymus for further maturation. T Cells Monocytes Roseola
7
(beta group)
HHV-7 HHV-7 Human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 and HHV-7 are similar double-stranded DNA viruses belonging to the Herpesviridae family. Human herpesviruses are ubiquitous and infections are commonly contracted during childhood. Human Herpesvirus 6 & 7 T cells T cells T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are important components of the adaptive immune system. Production starts from the hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, from which T-cell progenitor cells arise. These cells migrate to the thymus for further maturation. T Cells
8
(gamma group)
Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus
  • Lymphocytes Lymphocytes Lymphocytes are heterogeneous WBCs involved in immune response. Lymphocytes develop from the bone marrow, starting from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progressing to common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). B and T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells arise from the lineage. Lymphocytes
  • Epithelial cells
B cells B cells B lymphocytes, also known as B cells, are important components of the adaptive immune system. In the bone marrow, the hematopoietic stem cells go through a series of steps to become mature naive B cells. The cells migrate to secondary lymphoid organs for activation and further maturation. B Cells Kaposi’s sarcoma
* Bold in “clinical presentation” column: AIDS-defining illness
VZV: varicella-zoster virus Varicella-Zoster Virus Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a linear, double-stranded DNA virus in the Herpesviridae family. Varicella-zoster infections are highly contagious and transmitted through aerosolized respiratory droplets or contact with infected skin lesions. Varicella-Zoster Virus/Chickenpox

References

  1. Friel, T.J. (2021).  Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of cytomegalovirus infections in immunocompetent adults. UpToDate. Retrieved May 26, 2021, from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/epidemiology-clinical-manifestations-and-treatment-of-cytomegalovirus-infection-in-immunocompetent-adults
  2. Caliendo, A.M. (2020).  Overview of diagnostic tests Diagnostic tests Diagnostic tests are important aspects in making a diagnosis. Some of the most important epidemiological values of diagnostic tests include sensitivity and specificity, false positives and false negatives, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios, and pre-test and post-test probabilities. Epidemiological Values of Diagnostic Tests for cytomegalovirus infection. UpToDate. Retrieved May 26, 2021, from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/overview-of-diagnostic-tests-for-cytomegalovirus-infection
  3. Demmler-Harrison, G.J.  (2021). Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: clinical features and diagnosis. UpToDate. Retrieved May 26, 2021, from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/congenital-cytomegalovirus-infection-clinical-features-and-diagnosis
  4. Kaye, K.M. (2019). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. MSD Manual Professional Version. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from https://www.msdmanuals.com/professional/infectious-diseases/herpesviruses/cytomegalovirus-cmv-infection
  5. Gupta, M., Shorman, M. (2020). Cytomegalovirus. StatPearls. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459185/
  6. Akhter, K., Wills, T.S. (2018). Cytomegalovirus. In Bronze, M.S. (Ed.), Medscape. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/215702-overview
  7. Jean Beltram, P.M., Cristea, I.M. (2014). The life cycle and pathogenesis of human cytomegalovirus infection: lessons and proteomics. Expert Rev Proteomics 11:697–711. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/14789450.2014.971116

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