Neuroanatomy

Neuroanatomy

by Geoffrey Meyer, PhD, Craig Canby, PhD, Peter Ward, PhD

Prepare for your exams with award-winning medical teachers from all over the world who present detailed online videos discussing the field of neuroanatomy.

This course will provide you with the most important topics about the:

  • Autonomic Nervous System
  • Ventricular System
  • Spinal Cord
  • Brain Stem
  • 12 Cranial Nerves and Their Functions
  • Auditory System and Vestibular System
  • Cerrebellum
  • Basal Ganglia
  • Visual Pathways
  • Diencephalon
  • Cerebral Cortex
  • Limbic System
  • Meninges
  • Dural Venous System

Furthermore, you will receive essential insights into neural system development, as well as the sensory system and nervous tissue.

High-yield quiz questions and well-elaborated topic reviews will help you review your new knowledge and get the best exam preparation.

Course Details

  • Videos 150
  • Duration 11:47 h
  • Quiz questions 438
  • Articles 48

Content

Your Educators of course Neuroanatomy

 Geoffrey Meyer, PhD

Geoffrey Meyer, PhD

Prof. Geoffrey Meyer works at the School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology at the University of Western Australia.
He is the Coordinator for Histology on the Federative International Program for Anatomical Terminologies (FIPAT) of the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists (IFAA).
Professor Meyer is also the creator of “Meyer’s Histology” (http://histology-online.com) and, in collaboration with Professor John Campbell and Michael Hall, has provided an extensive collection of learning and teaching resources to deliver a histology course completely available online. Geoffrey Meyer’s research activities focus on developing innovative, computer-aided learning and teaching tools.

He has received a number of awards for his work, including the Australian University Teaching Award.
In 2006, and again in 2014, he received UWA Teaching Fellowships. Professor Meyer was also awarded a prestigious ALTC (Australian Learning and Teaching Council) Fellowship in 2009 and is currently the Project Leader on ALTC Project Grants.

 Craig Canby, PhD

Craig Canby, PhD

Dr. Craig Canby is Professor of Anatomy at Des Moines University in Iowa. He studied Biology and Chemistry at the Iowa Wesleyan College and later got his Ph.D. in Anatomy at the University of Iowa.
Canby has received many awards and honors for his work including the DPT Class of 2008 Teaching Excellence Award and the Award Hancher Finkbine Medallion.
His research is especially focused on anatomical variations and technology-enabled student learning.

 Peter Ward, PhD

Peter Ward, PhD

Peter J. Ward, Ph.D. has been teaching embryology, anatomy, histology, and neuroscience since 2005. He attended Carnegie Mellon University and later earned a Ph.D. in medical anatomy education from Purdue University. Dr. Ward enjoys finding ways to simplify the complex processes involved in human development and highlights the clinically-important aspects of embryology. Throughout these lectures, Dr. Ward shows how embryonic structures morph into the mature organs and other structures of the human body.


User reviews

(256)
4,1 of 5 stars
5 Stars
159
4 Stars
33
3 Stars
18
2 Stars
13
1  Star
33
 
Very helpful!
By Christina E. on 12. June 2019 for Head and Neck Anatomy

I just finished my first year of medical school and I’m reviewing over the summer. These videos are concise and to the point. I like how the questions are directly following. Very helpful, I wish I knew about it during school as well

 
Poor
By Kit T. on 03. June 2019 for Cerebellum

Dull lecture that is presented badly with no useful insights. As another reviewer pointed out, it isn't worth watching Craig's content, you are better off going to Youtube for better content.

 
improvement needed
By Ondrej V. on 28. May 2019 for Brain and Nervous System—Anatomy

I think that you are lacking a lot of information. Only the basics are seen. But the complex issues are not mentioned or not described at all. If I compare these anatomical videos with other subjects, I have to admit that the quality is way worse than average.

 
The one star reviews are wrong.
By Dylan F. on 21. May 2019 for Direct and Indirect Basal Ganglia Pathway

Not sure what the other reviewers mean by a one star review. This is a very straightforward lecture and easy to understand. The math makes intuitive sense if you sit and think about it for a second. I don't see how this was rated 1 star.