Musculoskeletal, Skin, and Connective Tissue—Anatomy

Musculoskeletal, Skin, and Connective Tissue—Anatomy

by Geoffrey Meyer, PhD, Craig Canby, PhD, James Pickering, PhD u.a.
(39)

The anatomy of the musculoskeletal, skin, and connective tissue is very important to all medical students and must be reviewed precisely. In specific online videos you will learn everything you need to know about the anatomy of the thorax and back muscles, the upper and lower limb.

Furthermore, you get an insight into the development of the musculoskeletal system and the pharyngeal arches.

On top of that, the medical lecturers from all over the world will teach you more about the histology of connective tissue, muscle tissue, and bone tissue.

Use quiz questions to repeat your knowledge and increase your medical skills by reading specific topic reviews.

Course Details

  • Videos 37
  • Duration 17:54 h
  • Quiz questions 148
  • Topic reviews 37

Content

Your Educators of course Musculoskeletal, Skin, and Connective Tissue—Anatomy

 Geoffrey Meyer, PhD

Geoffrey Meyer, PhD

Prof. Geoffrey Meyer works at the School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology at the University of Western Australia.
He is the Coordinator for Histology on the Federative International Program for Anatomical Terminologies (FIPAT) of the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists (IFAA).
Professor Meyer is also the creator of “Meyer’s Histology” (http://histology-online.com) and, in collaboration with Professor John Campbell and Michael Hall, has provided an extensive collection of learning and teaching resources to deliver a histology course completely available online. Geoffrey Meyer’s research activities focus on developing innovative, computer-aided learning and teaching tools.

He has received a number of awards for his work, including the Australian University Teaching Award.
In 2006, and again in 2014, he received UWA Teaching Fellowships. Professor Meyer was also awarded a prestigious ALTC (Australian Learning and Teaching Council) Fellowship in 2009 and is currently the Project Leader on ALTC Project Grants.

 Craig Canby, PhD

Craig Canby, PhD

Dr. Craig Canby is Professor of Anatomy at Des Moines University in Iowa. He studied Biology and Chemistry at the Iowa Wesleyan College and later got his Ph.D. in Anatomy at the University of Iowa.
Canby has received many awards and honors for his work including the DPT Class of 2008 Teaching Excellence Award and the Award Hancher Finkbine Medallion.
His research is especially focused on anatomical variations and technology-enabled student learning.

 James Pickering, PhD

James Pickering, PhD

Dr. James Pickering did his Ph.D. at the University of Leeds where he currently works as Associate Professor in Anatomy. He has made various publications on the human anatomy, such as "Access Anatomy: Abdomen", and is heavily involved in the delivery of anatomy teaching to medical, dental and intercalating students.

He regularly uses various modern learning tools to a great extent and was therefore rewarded as "The Most Innovative Teacher of the Year 2014" and "Learning Technologist of the Year 2014" by the Association of Learning Technologists. Additionally, he also received the "University of Leeds Teaching Award".

Amongst others, he currently researches contemporary methods of learning, e. g. the use of blended learning resources on student engagement and assessment, or the screencast as a method of consolidation as well as revision.

 John McLachlan, PhD

John McLachlan, PhD

John McLachlan is Professor of Medical Education at Durham University, is a UK National Teaching Fellow, and formerly Editor-in-Chief of the Journal "Medical Education". He has been teaching Embryology to medical students for many years, apparently to their pleasure and benefit!


User reviews

(39)
4,8 of 5 stars
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Precise enunciation, simplified explanations, attention grabbing
By Steven S. on 24. March 2017 for Cutaneous Innervation and Venous Drainage of Upper Limb

Doctor James offers precise simplified explanations which are easy to understand and it is easy to remain concentrated throughout the lecture. I liked the way he helped me draw a mental picture of the venous system of the upper limb from the hand to the heart. I would recommend this video to people who are considering taking the USMLE step 1

 
He explained clearly and a bit slowly its helps for the students from other countries like me who cant understand completely when u go fast and fluently and he expalined every single term clearly with definition
By raghavendra p. on 20. March 2017 for Epithelial Tissue: Skin

He explained clearly and a bit slowly its helps for the students from other countries like me who cant understand completely when u go fast and fluently and he expalined every single term clearly with definition,function and structure

 
Contrast of Lectures
By Ebenezer G. on 02. March 2017 for Upper Limb Anatomy

Lectures on Anatomy of the Heart was more concise, very comphrensible and corresponded with Last Anatomy textbook. Upper Limb Lectures wasn't as concise as Lectures on The Thorax( Heart). But I am very grateful to Lecturio for making my learning more simplified....

 
Can't see diagrams. Awful.
By WARREN W. on 25. February 2017 for Bones and Surface Anatomy of Lower Limb

Can't see diagrams. Awful. I will be happy to amend rating once this issue is fixed.

See all 39 user reviews with text