Abdominal Wall
Abdominal Wall

Abdominal Wall

by Craig Canby, PhD

Structure of the Abdominal Wall

The abdominal wall is a vital part of the human body and a common topic in medical exams. Back, vertebral column, pelvis … The following program introduces you to all associated organs and tissues.

Prof. Craig Canby displays understanding pain and patterns related to this area of the anatomy, sentinel node biopsy, osteology and more. He serves as a professor of anatomy at the Des Moines University in Iowa.

Likewise included are:

  • The Muscles and Topographic Anatomy of the Back
  • The Diaphragm
  • The Pelvic Wall and Floor

Course Details

  • Videos 45
  • Duration 5:08 h
  • Quiz questions 170
  • Concept Pages 10

Content

Your Educators of course Abdominal Wall

 Craig Canby, PhD

Craig Canby, PhD

Dr. Craig Canby is a Professor of Anatomy and the Associate Dean for Academic Curriculum and Medical Programs at the College of Osteopathic Medicine at Des Moines University, Iowa, USA.
He obtained his PhD in Anatomy at the University of Iowa.
For his achievements in teaching and research, he received various awards such as the DPT Class of 2008 Teaching Excellence Award and the prestigious Hancher-Finkbine Medallion.
Within Lecturio, Dr. Canby teaches courses on Anatomy.


User reviews

(33)
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I am from Pakistan'i am post graduate student working As medical officers .I love your lectures very much
By DR Muhammad Babar I. on 23. October 2021 for Abdominal Wall

I like it very much ,these are outstanding and beautiful ??

 
Excelent
By Gabriela Sofia O. on 22. September 2021 for Superficial Back Muscles – Back Muscles

Easy to understand and to take notes, even for a non native English talker

 
Abdominal wall
By OKWIR A. on 30. November 2020 for Abdominal Wall

It is really clear . I got it interesting and worth following.

 
Great review
By Edison T. on 13. November 2020 for Lumbar Vertebrae – Vertebral Column

Great review of the lumbar, sacral and coccygeal vertebrae. Thank you very much!