Biochemistry: Basics
Biochemistry: Basics

Biochemistry: Basics

by Kevin Ahern, PhD

Biochemistry is the study of biomolecules within living organisms. These compounds are found in every structure and process of every living species and appear to be key in the initiation and maintenance of life as we know it.

In this course, the student will be introduced to the basic principles of biochemistry, including the most important concepts regarding carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The levels of protein structures, gene expression, and basic metabolic functions will be covered as well.

For optimal comprehension, the student will be required to be familiar with the basic notions of molecular and cellular biology.

Course Details

  • Videos 72
  • Duration 4:59 h
  • Quiz questions 158
  • Concept Pages 24

Content

Your Educators of course Biochemistry: Basics

 Kevin Ahern, PhD

Kevin Ahern, PhD

Dr. Kevin Ahern is a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at Oregon State University (OSU), USA.
He obtained his PhD in Biochemistry from Oregon State University. Currently, he teaches courses for health sciences students at OSU.
He is co-author of three Open Educational electronic textbooks on Biochemistry and a Guide to Getting Into Medical School.
Due to his achievements, he earned OSUโ€™s highest teaching recognition, the Elizabeth P. Ritchie Distinguished Professor Award in 2017.
Within Lecturio, Dr. Ahern teaches courses on Biochemistry and on "How to Get into Medical Schoolโ€.


User reviews

(182)
4,5 of 5 stars
5 Stars
134
4 Stars
22
3 Stars
17
2 Stars
5
1  Star
4
 
Dr. Ahern
By Fadi J. on 22. November 2023 for Electron Carriers โ€“ Oxidation and Reduction in Metabolism

Dr. Ahern is amazing at linking what he's about to teach to previous videos.

 
Awesome course!
By Roberto E. on 01. November 2023 for Biochemistry: Basics

So far so good. The videos are easy to follow and I love the questions that pull up at the end of the videos to recall the information. Looking forward on finishing the rest of the modules in biochemistry, including all the other sections.

 
Errors in the Video
By Peddi A. on 12. October 2023 for Saccharides โ€“ Simple Carbohydrates

The following are the errors in the information you provided: 00:24 The general formula for monosaccharides is Cx(H2O)x, where x is equal to the number of carbon atoms in the monosaccharide. For example, the structural formula for glucose is C6H12O6, which means that it has six carbon atoms and six water molecules. 01:15 The structural formula for lactose is C12H22O11. This means that it is a disaccharide made up of two monosaccharides, glucose and galactose. 01:39 Polysaccharides are polymers of monosaccharides, but they do not necessarily have to have the same repeating sugar unit throughout. For example, amylopectin is a polysaccharide made up of glucose molecules, but it has a branched structure. Here is a corrected version of the information you provided: Carbohydrates are molecules whose name literally means hydrates of carbon. This is because monosaccharides, the simplest carbohydrates, have a ratio of one carbon atom to two hydrogen atoms to one oxygen atom, the same as water. The general formula for monosaccharides is Cx(H2O)x, where x is equal to the number of carbon atoms in the monosaccharide. For example, the structural formula for glucose is C6H12O6, which means that it has six carbon atoms and six water molecules. Disaccharides are carbohydrates that are made up of two monosaccharides. They are formed by a glycosidic linkage between the two monosaccharides. Disaccharides have the general formula C12H22O11. Examples of disaccharides include sucrose (glucose + fructose), lactose (glucose + galactose), and maltose (glucose + glucose). Polysaccharides are carbohydrates that are made up of many monosaccharides. They are formed by glycosidic linkages between the monosaccharides. Polysaccharides have the general formula (C6H10O5)n, where n is the number of monosaccharides in the polysaccharide. Examples of polysaccharides include cellulose, starch, glycogen, and chitin. Polysaccharides do not necessarily have to have the same repeating sugar unit throughout. For example, amylopectin is a polysaccharide made up of glucose molecules, but it has a branched structure.

 
Needs more problem solving, and new quizz.
By vicky s. on 03. October 2023 for Biochemistry: Basics

The lectures are not bad, they have the material, tbey are very well spoken and easy to undersgand. I find some quizz questions to not be relevant, i believe i won't be aske dthese questions on exam. And sometime the material itself feels dry. I am more of a doers, so by solving more complicated questions with the help of a professor would my learning experience much better. But over all not a bad course.