Lectures

Tubulointerstitial Disease

by Carlo Raj, MD
(2)

Questions about the lecture
My Notes
  • Required.
Save Cancel
    Learning Material 2
    • PDF
      Slides TubulointerstitialDisease RenalPathology.pdf
    • PDF
      Download Lecture Overview
    Report mistake

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Tubulointerstitial Disease by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Tubulointerstitial Diseases. It contains the following chapters:

    • Tubulointerstitial Pathology
    • Disturbance of Acute Renal Failure
    • Phases of Acute Kindey Injury
    • Algorithm of Acute Renal Injury
    • Urinalysism, Acute Renal Failure & Atheroembolism
    • Chronic Renal Failure
    • Pathophysiology of Renal Failure

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. < 0.4 L urine production per day
    2. < 100 mL urine per 12 hours
    3. < 300 mL urine production per day
    4. < 500 mL urine production per day
    5. < 1 L urine production per day
    1. Volume overload
    2. Sepsis
    3. Heavy metal toxicity
    4. Intravascular hemolytic disease
    5. Extravascular hemolytic disease
    1. Anion gap > 16
    2. Serum pH > 7.5
    3. Urine pH > 6
    4. Serum bicarbonate of 22 mmol/L
    5. Serum pH < 7.4
    1. Hyperphosphaturia
    2. Edema
    3. Normocytic anemia
    4. Hyperkalemia
    5. Hypertension
    1. Hyperkalemia
    2. Hypocalcemia
    3. Secondary hyperparathyroidism
    4. Hypernatremia
    5. Hyperphosphatemia
    1. The BUN-creatinine ratio is always elevated in acute kidney injury.
    2. It refers to the laboratory measurement of blood urea nitrogen.
    3. It is not useful for diagnosing disease of only the glomerulus.
    4. BUN:Cr ratio of 15 is approximately normal.
    5. It should only be used to assess acute kidney injury not chronic kidney failure.
    1. BUN:Cr ratio > 20-30
    2. BUN:Cr ratio > 10
    3. BUN:Cr ratio can’t distinguish between pre-renal and intrinsic azotemia.
    4. BUN:Cr ratio ~ 1
    5. BUN:Cr ratio <15
    1. Creatinine is slightly secreted.
    2. Creatinine is completely reabsorbed.
    3. BUN is not freely filtered.
    4. BUN is never reabsorbed.
    5. BUN is slightly secreted.
    1. Fractional excretion of sodium > 2%
    2. Fractional excretion of sodium < 1%
    3. Urine sodium < 10 mmol/L
    4. Serum BUN/Cr ratio > 20-30
    5. Serum BUN/Cr Ratio < 15
    1. Hyperkalemia
    2. Hypovolemia
    3. All are expected changes
    4. Metabolic alkalosis
    5. Polyuria
    1. Imaging
    2. Bun/Cr ratio
    3. Serum potassium levels
    4. Urine output
    5. Fractional excretion of sodium
    1. Hypokalemia
    2. Polyuria
    3. Uremia
    4. Azotemia
    5. Fractional excretion of sodium
    1. Urine osmolality < 350
    2. Urine Na < 10 mmol/L
    3. Metabolic alkalosis
    4. Serum BUN/Cr > 20
    5. Fractional excretion of sodium < 1%
    1. Renal ultrasound
    2. Microalbuminuria dipstick
    3. Urine specific gravity
    4. Urine culture
    5. Glucose dipstick
    1. Post-renal obstruction
    2. Pre-renal ischemia
    3. Chronic renal failure
    4. Glomerulonephritis
    5. Renal artery stenosis
    1. Interstitial nephritis
    2. Acute tubular necrosis
    3. Minimal change disease
    4. Pre-renal ischemia
    5. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis
    1. Isosthenuria
    2. Protein > 3.5 g/d
    3. Urine osmolality > 500 mOsm/L
    4. Renomegaly
    5. RBC casts
    1. Acute tubular necrosis
    2. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis
    3. Pyelonephritis
    4. Chronic renal failure
    5. Acute interstitial nephritis
    1. Peripheral eosinophilia
    2. RBC casts in the urine
    3. Hyponatremia
    4. Purpura
    5. Polyuria
    1. All are correct.
    2. Blue or gangrenous digits.
    3. Painful, firm erythematous nodules
    4. Petechiae
    5. Purpura
    1. Stage 4
    2. Stage 1
    3. Stage 5
    4. Stage 3
    5. Stage 2
    1. 15-29
    2. < 15
    3. >90
    4. 60-89
    5. 30-59
    1. Renal vein renin activity
    2. Plasma Renin activity
    3. BUN/Cr ratio
    4. Serum aldosterone levels
    5. Renal biopsy
    1. Stage 5
    2. Stage 1
    3. Stage 4
    4. Stage 3
    5. Stage 2
    1. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis
    2. Rapid progressive Glomerulonephritis
    3. Membranous glomerulonephritis
    4. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis
    5. Minimal change disease
    1. 1 alpha hydroxylase
    2. 5 alpha reductase
    3. Dihydrofolate reductase
    4. 17 alpha hydroxylase
    5. Vitamin D 25-hydroxylase
    1. Elevated calcitriol levels
    2. Hypocalcemia
    3. Metabolic acidosis
    4. Secondary hyperparathyroidism
    5. Hyperphosphatemia
    1. All are potential mechanisms.
    2. Metabolic acidosis leaches calcium out of the bone
    3. None are potential mechanisms.
    4. Impaired synthesis from metabolic abnormalities of renal failure
    5. Secondary hyperparathyroidism stimulates osteoclastic activity

    Author of lecture Tubulointerstitial Disease

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


    Customer reviews

    (2)
    3,5 of 5 stars
    5 Stars
    1
    4 Stars
    0
    3 Stars
    0
    2 Stars
    1
    1  Star
    0
     
    Goljan 2.0
    By William S. on 09. May 2017 for Tubulointerstitial Disease

    Dr Raj is outstanding, and these lectures are excellent. These are perfect for preparing for medical exams. Detailed, in depth, and concise, I am hugely impressed.

     
    Significant Omissions
    By Hamed S. on 07. March 2017 for Tubulointerstitial Disease

    The title of this lecture is misleading, very little time spent exploring tubular disease. The focus is in fact acute and chronic renal failure. Moreover, no explanation was provided about the criteria for AKI (e.g RIFLE) or the actual management of renal failure (different types of dialysis). What was useful was the algorithm provided.