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Laboratory Diagnostics: Pulmonary Function Test (PFT)

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Laboratory Diagnostics: Pulmonary Function Test (PFT) by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Pulmonary Diagnostics. It contains the following chapters:

    • Pulmonary Function Testing
    • Spirometry
    • Loop Spirometries
    • Other Spirometry Patterns
    • Diffusion Capacity

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. FEV1/FVC
    2. TLC and RC
    3. Diffusion capacity of CO
    4. VC and TLC
    5. FEV1/TLC
    1. It cannot be expelled because prevents the lungs from collapsing
    2. It is the amount of air that is fully diluted by N2 or He
    3. It is responsible for the recoil of the chest wall
    4. It represents limitations on airflow
    5. It represents the surface area available for gas exchange
    1. Body plethysmography
    2. Spirometry
    3. DLCO
    4. FEV1/FVC
    5. Gas dilution
    1. Inspiratory capacity + expiratory reserve volume
    2. Inspiratory capacity + tidal volume
    3. Inspiratory reserve volume + tidal volume
    4. Inspiratory reserve volume + expiratory reserve volume
    5. Tidal volume + expiratory reserve volume
    1. Expiratory reserve volume + residual volume
    2. Expiratory reserve volume + tidal volume
    3. Tidal volume + residual volume
    4. Vital capacity + residual volume
    5. Expiratory reserve volume + inspiratory capacity
    1. Increased TLC
    2. Decreased residual volume
    3. Increased tidal volume
    4. Decreased functional residual capacity
    5. Decreased total lung capacity
    1. Obstructive lung disease
    2. Restrictive lung disease
    3. Decreased residual volume
    4. Increased tidal volume
    5. Increased FEV1
    1. Restrictive lung disease
    2. Obstructive lung disease
    3. FEV1/FVC ration < 0.8
    4. Increased TLC
    5. Drastic decrease in FEV1
    1. Obstructive lung disease with superimposed restrictive lung disease
    2. Improvement in the obstructive lung disease toward a normal FEV1/FVC ratio
    3. Obstructive lung disease that has progressed to restrictive lung disease
    4. Increased forced vital capacity
    5. Increased vital capacity
    1. Residual volume
    2. FEV1
    3. FVC
    4. FEV1/FVC ratio
    5. Expiratory reserve volume + tidal volume + inspiratory capacity
    1. Inspiration
    2. Expiration
    3. Residual volume
    4. Obstruction
    5. Restriction
    1. The end of exhalation marks the maximum TLC
    2. Pleural pressure becomes less negative
    3. Elastic recoil pressure approaches equilibrium with pleural pressure
    4. Diaphragm passively moves into thoracic cavity
    5. Alveolar pressure becomes positive
    1. Residual volume has increased
    2. TLC has decreased
    3. FEV1 has increased
    4. FRC has decreased
    5. Expiratory capacity has increased
    1. Shift in the loop to the right
    2. Normal loop spirometry
    3. Shift in the loop to the left
    4. Increased residual volume
    5. Increased TLC
    1. Fixed obstruction
    2. Variable intrathoracic
    3. Variable extrathoracic
    4. Obstructive
    5. Restrictive
    1. Variable extrathoracic
    2. Variable intrathoracic
    3. Obstructive
    4. Fixed obstructive
    5. Restrictive
    1. It represents an exhalation dysfunction
    2. It represents an inhalation dysfunction
    3. It shows a decrease in residual volume
    4. It shows a decrease in TLC
    5. It represents a mixed obstructive and restrictive pattern
    1. It diffuses across the alveolar membrane faster than O2
    2. It binds to hemoglobin with a lower affinity than O2
    3. It can be tagged using radioactive markers
    4. It is a significantly smaller molecule
    5. It has a higher partial pressure in room air
    1. Widened A-a gradient
    2. Increase in alveolar surface area
    3. Decreased alveolar blood flow
    4. Decreased thickness of the alveolar membrane
    5. Increased diffusion of non-oxygen substances
    1. There is a greater barrier to diffusion at the level of the alveoli
    2. There is a greater barrier to diffusion at the level of the bronchi
    3. There is an increase in surface area
    4. There is a decrease in oxygen saturation
    5. There is an increase in residual volume

    Author of lecture Laboratory Diagnostics: Pulmonary Function Test (PFT)

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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