Lectures

Anatomy of the Forearm

by James Pickering, PhD
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    In this lecture, we’re going to look at the forearm. So we’ll start off by looking at the forearm in cross-section. We’ll look at the forearm fascia or the antebrachial fascia, and the various compartments that are formed. We’ll then look at these compartments, the anterior compartment and the posterior compartment. And in both of them, we’ll look at the various muscles, be a flexor, pronator or extensor muscles. We’ll look at various layers they formed, and also the various neurovascular relations. So here we can see a cross-section through the forearm, showing the various muscles in their compartments, the interosseous membrane that’s running between the two bones, the radius and the ulna. And we can see that with this transverse section, we can divide the forearm into this anterior compartment here, and this posterior compartment. Remember, this is the inferior view and this is a right forearm. So we’re looking at it from below. We can see laterally, we have the radius, and medially, we have the ulna. These two bones are connected from the interosseous borders via the interosseous membrane. Radiating from these bones to the perimeter of the forearm, we have that intermuscular septae, and this is the continuation of the antebrachial fascia from the perimeter into the middle of the arm. So this intermuscular septae running across, and the interosseous membrane, forms the anterior compartment and the posterior compartment. Here, we can also see various blood vessels and nerves, so we can pick up the median nerve. We can see the ulna nerve and the ulnar artery. We can see the radial artery and the radial nerve as well. And we’ll look at this in more detail as we go through this lecture. The anterior compartment contains muscles that are ultimately going to flex the wrist....

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Anatomy of the Forearm by James Pickering, PhD is from the course Upper Limb Anatomy. It contains the following chapters:

    • Forearm in cross-section
    • Anterior compartment
    • Deep Layer (AC)
    • Superficial and middle layers (AC)
    • Posterior compartment
    • Deep/outcropping layer (PC)

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Brachioradialis forms its lateral border
    2. Is a diamond shaped region, anterior to the elbow joint
    3. Its superior border is a transverse line between the lateral and medial epicondyles
    4. Flexor carpi radialis forms its medial border
    5. It has the ulnar nerve coursing through it
    1. Anterior surface of the medial epicondyle
    2. Anterior surface of the lateral epicondyle
    3. Posterior surface of the lateral epicondyle
    4. Posterior surface of the medial epicondyle
    1. Posterior surface of the lateral epicondyle
    2. Anterior surface of the lateral epicondyle
    3. Anterior surface of the medial epicondyle
    4. Posterior surface of the medial epicondyle
    1. It enters the hand by passing through the carpal tunnel
    2. It Courses around the medial epicondyle
    3. It supplies flexor carpi unlnaris
    4. It is derived from the medial cord of the brachial plexus
    5. It supplies the medial part of flexor digitorum profundus
    1. If it is severely compressed at the level of the elbow or upper arm it leads to what is termed the claw hand
    2. It courses through the cubital fossa lateral to the brachial artery
    3. It courses between flexor digitorum profundus and the interosseous membrane in the anterior compartment of the forearm
    4. It i derived from the posterior cord of brachial plexus
    5. It supplies all the muscles in the anterior compartment of the forearm
    1. It is involved in returning the forearm to a mid-prone position (tennis racket grip)
    2. It is supplied by the median nerve
    3. It forms the lateral border of the cubital fossa
    4. It originates from the lateral epicondyle of the humerus
    5. It can flex the hand at the wrist joint
    1. The distal phalanges of the medial four fingers
    2. The proximal phalanges of the medial four fingers
    3. The middle phalanges of the medial four fingers
    4. The heads of the medial four metacarpals
    5. The bases of the medial four metacarpals

    Author of lecture Anatomy of the Forearm

     James Pickering, PhD

    James Pickering, PhD


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