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Cancer Drugs & Chemotherapeutic Agents: MTX, 5-FU, 6-MP, 6TG & Ara-C – White Blood Cell Pathology

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    Let’s take a look at the most important arrest point, between G1 and S phase. There’s a nice little cycle here to show you where your antineoplastics will be located. Let’s begin. If you’re looking at your S phase, which is DNA synthesis replication, that will be antimetabolites. And I’ll walk you through tables. There are tables and tables and tables that are coming. They’re all beyond valuable. I mean, they’re just absolutely invaluable, okay? Now, you know the tables well. There’s no way you can miss a question in pathology or pharmacology about cancers, seriously. So, let’s take a look. But first, organize your thoughts. Antimetabolites, DNA replication has been inhibited. Then you have a drug called etoposide. Etoposide, when I walked you through the mechanism of action, well, not only inhibits a neoplastic cell. Remember, how long does a cancer cell want to be in here? Obviously, forever. Where am I? In the cell, in the nucleus, right? Because I’m trying to -- DNA mitosis. So now, etoposide, S and G2 phase will be inhibited. What does G2 mean to you? Post-translational modification. And bleomycin specifically works in G2. And then in your M phase, which is your mitosis. Okay, now, of all the mitosis in pathology, you’ll be paying attention to meta, meta, metaphase; prophase, metaphase, then you have your anaphase, telophase, right? The point is your metaphase is when the chromosomes will be lined up in the middle. That’s important. And those of your vinca alkaloids and what’s known as your taxols. Now, this is your dogma for your DNA synthesis. So we’ll take a look at nucleotide synthesis and their inhibitors, such as methotrexate, 5-FU, a decrease of thymidine synthesis, and then you have other drugs such as 6-mercaptopurine, which then knocks out your purine....

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Cancer Drugs & Chemotherapeutic Agents: MTX, 5-FU, 6-MP, 6TG & Ara-C – White Blood Cell Pathology by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Leukemia – White Blood Cell Pathology (WBC).


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Inhibit DNA replication
    2. Free radical formation
    3. Inhibit dihydrofolate reductase
    4. Triggers apoptosis
    5. Alkylates DNA
    1. Etoposide
    2. Taxols
    3. Antimetabolites
    4. Tamoxifen
    5. Busulfan
    1. …thymidylate synthase.
    2. …thioredoxin reductase.
    3. … thiamine oxidase.
    4. … topoisomerase II.
    5. … glutathione reductase.
    1. Methotrexate
    2. Busulfan
    3. Bleomycin
    4. Doxorubicin
    5. Tamoxifen
    1. …thymidylate synthase.
    2. …thioredoxin reductase.
    3. … thiamine oxidase.
    4. … topoisomerase II.
    5. … glutathione reductase.
    1. Decrease in purine synthesis
    2. Inhibition of topoisomerase II
    3. Inhibition of DNA polymerase
    4. Free radicle generation
    5. Inhibition of reductase
    1. Inhibits DNA polymerase
    2. Intercalate in DNA
    3. Inhibits reductase
    4. Inhibits topoisomerase II
    5. Free radical formation

    Author of lecture Cancer Drugs & Chemotherapeutic Agents: MTX, 5-FU, 6-MP, 6TG & Ara-C – White Blood Cell Pathology

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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