Lectures

Pregnancy Physiology: Gastrointestinal, Renal and Metabolic System

by Veronica Gillispie, MD, FACOG
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Pregnancy Physiology: Gastrointestinal, Renal and Metabolic System by Veronica Gillispie, MD, FACOG is from the course Antenatal Care. It contains the following chapters:

    • Gastrointestinal, Renal and Metabolic System
    • Metabolic System

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Increase in progesterone decreases the lower esophageal sphincter tone
    2. Decrease in estrogen decreases the lower esophageal sphincter tone
    3. Decrease in progesterone decreases gastric motility
    4. First trimester nausea damages gastric mucosa
    5. The uterus compresses the stomach in the first trimester
    1. Due to physiologic hydronephrosis and decreased ureter motility
    2. Due to changes in mucosal pH levels
    3. Due to physiologic hydronephrosis and increased ureter motility
    4. Due to increased glomerular filtration rate
    5. Due to increase in kidney size
    1. Decreased respiratory residual volume
    2. Decreased tone of the lower esophageal sphincter
    3. Decreased motility of the ureter
    4. Decreased systemic vascular resistance
    5. Decreased smooth muscle tone in the uterus
    1. Increased glomerular filtration rate
    2. Decreased creatinine clearance
    3. Increased serum creatinine
    4. Increased ureter motility
    5. Decreased kidney size
    1. 10-20%
    2. 5-10%
    3. 50-60%
    4. 75%
    5. 100%
    1. Both progesterone and estrogen levels increase
    2. Progesterone level increases, while estrogen levels decrease
    3. Aldosterone levels decrease, while renin levels increase
    4. Both aldosterone and renin levels decrease
    5. Estrogen levels increase, while relaxin levels decrease
    1. ...everson of the endocervical glands.
    2. ...increased melanocytes.
    3. ...increased uterine size.
    4. ...increased blood volume.
    5. There is never a physiologic reason for spotting during pregnancy. Any bleeding during pregnancy is abnormal and needs full evaluation until a pathological cause is determined.

    Author of lecture Pregnancy Physiology: Gastrointestinal, Renal and Metabolic System

     Veronica Gillispie, MD, FACOG

    Veronica Gillispie, MD, FACOG


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