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Oxidising and Reducing Agents – Other Ionic Reactions

by Adam Le Gresley, PhD
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    The lecture Oxidising and Reducing Agents – Other Ionic Reactions by Adam Le Gresley, PhD is from the course Ionic Chemistry.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. 1.81 g
    2. 0.181 g
    3. 5.02 g
    4. 5.28 g
    5. 3.62 g
    1. During a chemical reaction, an oxidant gets oxidized while the reductant gets reduced under the influence of metal catalysts
    2. An oxidizing agent (oxidant)gets reduced itself during a reaction and simultaneously causes oxidation of another compound
    3. A reducing agent (reductant) gets oxidized and leads to a reduction of another compound participating in the chemical reaction with it
    4. A reductant loses its electrons to the oxidant during a redox reaction
    5. An oxidant acts as an electron acceptor because it gains electrons from an electron donor or reducing agent during a chemical reaction
    1. Fe
    2. O2
    3. F2
    4. Br2
    5. O3
    1. The Daniell cell is an unusual type of electrochemical cell, which does not involve any redox reaction
    2. Halogens act as a good oxidizing agent because they try to obtain a noble gas like configuration by gaining electrons
    3. H2, CO, Zn, Fe, Na and Li are good reducing agents
    4. Alkali and alkaline earth metals behave as reductants by losing electrons to get a noble gas like configuration
    5. The fundamental biological processes like metabolism and photosynthesis involve the participation of reducing and oxidizing agents to harvest energy
    1. …of an oxidizing agent decreases while that of reducing agent increases
    2. …of oxidizing agent increases while that of a reducing agent decreases.
    3. …of an oxidizing agent remains unchanged while that of a reducing agent can either decrease or increase
    4. …of a reducing agent remains unchanged while that of an oxidizing agent can either decrease or increase
    5. …of both reducing and oxidizing agents remain unaffected
    1. …due to the presence of stable states of d-orbitals.
    2. …due to the presence of unstable states of d-shell
    3. …due to a more stable 4s-subshell
    4. …due to high ionization energies
    5. …because of the presence of paired electrons in all d-orbitals of d-shell
    1. In a water molecule, the algebraic sum of oxidation numbers of all the atoms can be +1
    2. A free element has zero oxidation number
    3. In the case of a monoatomic ion, the oxidation number is equal to the net charge on the ion.
    4. In a neutral molecule, the algebraic sum of oxidation numbers of all the atoms must be zero.
    5. Hydrogen, fluorine and oxygen usually exhibit oxidation numbers +1, -1 and -2, respectively in most of the compounds.
    1. In peroxides, the oxygen molecule exhibits -3 oxidation state.
    2. Hydrogen exhibits an oxidation state of +1 with non-metals, but in metal hydrides of Group 1 metals like NaH or KH, it exists in -1 oxidation state.
    3. In F2O compound, the oxygen has +2 oxidation number as due to more electronegative character fluorine exists in -1 oxidation state.
    4. Chlorine in compounds with fluorine or oxygen exhibits variable oxidation states ranging from +1 to +7.
    5. The oxidation number of sulfur in sulfate ion (SO42-) is +6, whereas in sulfite (SO32-) the oxidation number is +4.
    1. The upper limit is equal to the group number, whereas the lower limit is given by the formula: Lower limit = (Group number – 8)
    2. The upper limit of oxidation state can be calculated by a formula: Upper limit = (Group number – 8)
    3. The lower limit of oxidation state is equal to the group number
    4. It is not easy to predict the upper limit of the oxidation state of main group elements
    5. It is not easy to predict the lower limit of the oxidation state of main group elements
    1. …+6 and +7, respectively
    2. …-2 and 0, respectively
    3. …-1 and 0, respectively
    4. …-2 and -1, respectively
    5. …-1 and -1, respectively
    1. …small and highly electronegative elements like oxygen and fluorine
    2. …small and highly electropositive elements like sodium and lithium
    3. …large and highly electropositive elements like cesium and francium
    4. …helium gas at 80°C
    5. …d-block elements
    1. …exchange of electrons
    2. …exchange of neutrons
    3. …exchange of protons
    4. …exchange of photons
    5. …exchange of alpha particles
    1. In an electrochemical cell, an electrode with low electron affinity will lose the electrons, while an electrode with high electron affinity will gain the electron
    2. An electrochemical cell is capable of generating electric power from a chemical reaction
    3. A salt bridge provides an ionic contact between the two half-cells of an electrochemical cell
    4. Each half-cell in an electrochemical battery includes an electrode and an electrolyte
    5. In an electrochemical cell, one metallic compound or electrode gains the electrons while other releases the electrons depending upon their respective electron affinities

    Author of lecture Oxidising and Reducing Agents – Other Ionic Reactions

     Adam Le Gresley, PhD

    Adam Le Gresley, PhD


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