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Orbitals – Introduction to Chemistry

by Adam Le Gresley, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Orbitals – Introduction to Chemistry by Adam Le Gresley, PhD is from the course Chemistry: Introduction.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. …a mathematical function which tells the probability of occurrence of an electron at a specific region around the nucleus.
    2. …a mathematical function which tells the amount of charge on an electron in an atom.
    3. …a mathematical function which tells the amount of effective charge on an electron.
    4. …a mathematical function which tells a number of attractive forces between an electron and nucleus of the atom.
    5. …a mathematical function which tells the velocity an electron revolving around the nucleus in an atom.
    1. …determines the orbital angular momentum and gives an estimation regarding the shape of an orbital.
    2. …determines the negative charge of the electrons present in particular orbitals.
    3. …helps in determining the location and velocity of an electron around the nucleus with accuracy at a given time frame.
    4. …helps in determining the magnetic spin of two electrons present in two distant orbitals.
    5. …helps in the calculation of total effectiveness of nuclear charge on the electrons present at a particular spatial point in an atom.
    1. 0, 1, 2
    2. 1, 2, 3
    3. -2, -1, 0, +1, +2
    4. -1, 0, +1
    5. -3, -2, -1, 0, +1, +2, +3
    1. 14
    2. 10
    3. 12
    4. 16
    5. 18
    1. Spherical
    2. Dumbbell
    3. cloverleaf-like
    4. Diffused
    5. Cubic
    1. -2, -1, 0, +1, +2
    2. -3, -2, -1, 0, +1, +2, +3
    3. 0, 1, 2, 3
    4. 1, 2, 3
    5. -1, 0, +1
    1. …are filled evenly by Hund’s rule before moving to the orbitals having higher energies.
    2. …are filled by Aufbau principle before moving to the other orbitals present in an atom.
    3. …usually contain excited state electrons.
    4. …provide an extra space for the accommodation of neutrons.
    5. …provide an additional space for the accommodation of protons.

    Author of lecture Orbitals – Introduction to Chemistry

     Adam Le Gresley, PhD

    Adam Le Gresley, PhD


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