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Measures of Association: Attributable Risk and Odds Ratio

by Raywat Deonandan, PhD
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    Hello and welcome to epidemiology. You know that smoking is bad for you right? You know that smoking is probably the most important and prominent risk factor in probably causing lung cancer, but I bet you also know people who have smoked all their lives and lived to be 1000 without having any appreciable illness and I bet you also know people who have probably tragically succumbed to cancer and never having smoked a day in their lives. That's because exposures don't necessarily result in disease outcome, it's just that they are more likely to do so versus people who aren't exposed to those things. So what we care about is how much of an outcome, like lung cancer, can we attribute to an exposure like smoking. So today we're going to talk about attributable risk and you're going to learn how to calculate two types of attributable risk. We're also going to change text a bit and talk about something called an odds ratio, which is another kind of risk measurement. So we've already talked about relative risk. Relative risk is one of the most important measurements of associating a risky behavior or exposure to an outcome like a disease and now we're going to talk about attributable risk. There are two kinds of attributable risk we're going to learn about. Now remember some non-smokers also get lung cancer and some people who smoked don't get lung cancer. The question is always how much of the behavior can we attribute to the outcome and how much of the outcome can we attribute to the behavior. That's why we talk about attributable risk, sometimes called excess risk. In other words, how much risk in excess of the baseline does a certain behavior offer. Now we always go back to our...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Measures of Association: Attributable Risk and Odds Ratio by Raywat Deonandan, PhD is from the course Measures of Association. It contains the following chapters:

    • Measures of Association: Attributable Risk and Odds Ratio
    • Attributable Risk
    • Odds Ratio
    • Learning Outcomes

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. OR = 3.89 The salad is strongly associated with getting diarrhea.
    2. OR = 1.76 The salad is not strongly associated with getting diarrhea.
    1. The OR is NOT a good approximation of RR in this case since the prevalence of diarrhea is 60/100 or 60%, which is not rare.
    2. The OR is a good approximation of the RR in this case since the prevalence of diarrhea is 60/100 or 60%, which is not rare.
    3. The OR is NOT a good approximation of the RR in this case since the prevalence of diarrhea is 60/100 or 60%, which is rare.
    4. The OR is a good approximation of the RR in this case since the prevalence of diarrhea is 60/100 or 60%, which is rare.
    1. False.
    2. True.

    Author of lecture Measures of Association: Attributable Risk and Odds Ratio

     Raywat Deonandan, PhD

    Raywat Deonandan, PhD


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