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Hearing Tests: Rinne Test and Weber Test

by Craig Canby, PhD
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    00:00 Now, it’s time for you to think about some auditory tests. There are two tests that can be performed to determine how intact the auditory pathway is. One is the Rinne test. The other test for you to remember is the Weber test. First, I want you to understand the Rinne test as an auditory test.

    00:30 Here, a tuning fork is going to be used to assess bone conduction and air conduction of sound.

    00:41 First, a tuning fork would be placed at the mastoid process. This will help you evaluate bone conduction as a practicing clinician. From here, the tuning fork would be placed near the external acoustic meatus or the ear canal to evaluate the conduction of audition through the air. If this is normal, air conduction time will be twice as long as bone conduction time. So it’s going to take longer for someone to hear a sound via air conduction than through bone conduction. However, if someone has conduction hearing loss, again this is conduction hearing loss, bone conduction will be greater or equal to air conduction. If the loss is attributable to damage to the neural pathway and this would be sensorineural loss and if this is the case, air conduction is going to be greater than bone conduction but less than twice as long. Your normal would be twice as long if you have sensorineural loss.

    02:07 Air conduction is still going to be greater than bone conduction but it'll be less than twice as long.

    02:14 The Weber test is another auditory test that can be performed. Here, the tuning fork, once it’s vibrating will be placed on the top of the middle skull. You'll ask the patient where is the sound coming from.

    02:33 If everything is working normally, the patient will respond that they can hear in both ears.

    02:42 If there’s some pathology at play such as conduction hearing loss, if it’s unilateral, the vibration will be louder in the affected ear. So if there’s conduction hearing loss in the left ear, the vibration will be louder in the left ear because that’s the one that’s affected. If there’s unilateral sensorineural loss, the vibration is going to be louder in the normal ear because of the impairment in the affected ear.

    03:17 This table on auditory tests allows you to make sense of the Weber test versus the Rinne test, normal versus abnormal. So if we take a look here, normal evaluation in the Rinne test which shows that air conduction is greater than bone conduction bilaterally. This should be about twice as long.

    03:49 In the Weber test, the individual should be able to hear and localize the sound in both ears.

    03:59 With conductive hearing loss, the Rinne test will demonstrate that bone conduction is going to be greater than air conduction in the affected ear, whereas air conduction will be greater than bone conduction in the unaffected ear. With the Weber test, conductive hearing loss will be characterized by the lateralization to the affected ear. Then lastly, with sensorineural hearing loss with the Rinne test, air conduction is going to be greater than bone conduction in both ears. Then the Weber test will demonstrate lateralization to the unaffected ear away from the affected ear.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Hearing Tests: Rinne Test and Weber Test by Craig Canby, PhD is from the course Auditory System and Vestibular System.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Air conduction is greater than the bone conduction but less than twice as long.
    2. Air conduction is equal to the bone conduction.
    3. Bone conduction is greater than air conduction but less than twice as long.
    4. It is difficult to measure air and bone conduction due to hearing impairment.
    5. Air conduction time is twice as long as bone conduction.
    1. In unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, it is lateralized towards the normal ear.
    2. In bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, it is lateralized towards right ear.
    3. In bilateral conductive hearing loss, it is lateralized towards left ear.
    4. In unilateral conductive hearing loss, it is lateralized towards the normal ear.
    5. In unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, it is lateralized towards the affected ear.
    1. BC>AC in affected ear, AC>BC in normal ear and Weber lateralized towards affected side
    2. BC>AC in normal ear, AC>BC in affected ear and Weber lateralized towards affected side
    3. BC>AC in affected ear, AC
    4. BC>AC in affected ear, AC>BC in normal ear and Weber lateralized towards normal ear
    5. BCBC in normal ear and Weber lateralized towards affected side

    Author of lecture Hearing Tests: Rinne Test and Weber Test

     Craig Canby, PhD

    Craig Canby, PhD


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