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Atom – Introduction to Chemistry

by Adam Le Gresley, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Atom – Introduction to Chemistry by Adam Le Gresley, PhD is from the course Chemistry: Introduction.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. …the study of movements and interactions of electrons.
    2. …the role of metals in the synthesis of organic compounds.
    3. …the role of hydrocarbons in fossil fuel formation.
    4. …the production of fossil fuels via degradation of plant waste.
    5. …design, chemical synthesis, and development of fossil fuels.
    1. A nucleon can be either a proton or a neutron located in the orbitals of an atom along with electrons.
    2. Protons have +1 charge whereas neutrons are neutral.
    3. Both proton and neutron are composite particles, each having a mass of 1 atomic unit.
    4. A proton is made up of two up and one down quarks.
    5. A neutron is comprised of one up and two down quarks.
    1. …1.67 × 10^-18 micrograms.
    2. …1.67 × 10^-18 grams
    3. …16.7 × 10^-18 micrograms
    4. …16.7 × 10^-18 grams
    5. …16.7 × 10^-24 grams
    1. An electron can be divided into quark, boson and photon particles.
    2. The mass of an electron is 9.11 × 10^-31 kilograms.
    3. Electrons are the actual particles in an atom which participate in the ionic or covalent bond formations.
    4. An electron is an elementary sub-atomic particle with -1.6 × 10^-19 coulombs of elementary charge on it.
    5. The electrons were discovered by J.J. Thomson in 1897 during the cathode ray experiment.
    1. …their atomic masses due to a different number of neutrons in their nuclei.
    2. …their atomic masses due to a different number of protons in their nuclei.
    3. …their atomic charges due to a different number of protons in their nuclei.
    4. …their atomic charges due to a different number of electrons in their shells.
    5. …their atomic mass due to a different number of protons in their shells.
    1. …lose of one or more fundamental particles to achieve a stable state.
    2. …lose of one electron to achieve a stable state.
    3. …lose of atomic nucleus to achieve a stable state.
    4. …lose of outermost electron shell to achieve a stable state.
    5. …lose of an atomic orbital to achieve a stable state.
    1. Uranium
    2. Francium
    3. Technetium
    4. Protactinium
    5. Radon

    Author of lecture Atom – Introduction to Chemistry

     Adam Le Gresley, PhD

    Adam Le Gresley, PhD


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