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Approach to Acid Base Status: Step 4 – Laboratory Diagnostics

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Approach to Acid Base Status: Step 4 – Laboratory Diagnostics by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Pulmonary Diagnostics.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. 10-14
    2. 12-18
    3. 1-5
    4. 3-7
    5. 16-22
    1. 7-11
    2. 10-14
    3. 13-17
    4. 11-15
    5. 7-14
    1. Is not affected by levels of K or Mg in the body
    2. Anion gap = unmeasured anions - unmeasured cations
    3. Anion gap = Na - (Cl + HCO3)
    4. May include organic anions and proteins
    5. Is influenced by the levels of albumin in the serum
    1. 22
    2. 10
    3. 42
    4. 12
    5. 24
    1. Ketones
    2. Lactic acid
    3. Pyruvate
    4. Salicylic acid
    5. Hydrochloric acid
    1. Measured osmolality - calculated osmolality
    2. Urine osmolality - serum osmolality
    3. Calculated osmolality - measured osmolality
    4. Measured osmolality - (ketones + BUN)
    5. Na + glucose/2 + BUN
    1. Osmolal gap > 10
    2. Negative toxin screen
    3. Elevated ketones in urine
    4. Increased BUN
    5. Anion gap > 20
    1. Change in HCO3 = change in anion gap
    2. Change in HCO3 > change in anion gap
    3. Change in HCO3 < change in anion gap
    4. Change in delta gap = change in anion gap
    5. Change in delta gap > change in anion gap
    1. bicarbonate being lower than expected in relation to the unmeasured anions calculated from the anion gap
    2. a normal anion gap with increased unmeasured anions above what is expected due to changes in bicarbonate
    3. a change in bicarbonate is lower than expected when compared to measured anions
    4. a change in bicarbonate equals change in anion gap
    5. a change in delta gap equals change in anion gap
    1. The acidosis is caused by loss of bicarbonate at the level of the kidney
    2. The acidosis is due to ingestion of an exogenous substance
    3. The acidosis is due to an increased production of bicarbonate at the level of the kidney
    4. The patient is compensating for the acidosis by secreting bicarbonate in the urine
    5. The acidosis has an extrarenal etiology

    Author of lecture Approach to Acid Base Status: Step 4 – Laboratory Diagnostics

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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