Lectures

Approach to Acid Base Status: Step 3 (cont'd) – Laboratory Diagnostics

by Carlo Raj, MD
(1)

Questions about the lecture
My Notes
  • Required.
Save Cancel
    Learning Material 2
    • PDF
      Slides DiagnosticsAcidosisAlkidosisStep3-5 RespiratoryPathology.pdf
    • PDF
      Download Lecture Overview
    Report mistake
    Transcript

    00:01 PO2 drops down to 40. How many oxygen have on your haemoglobin? 4. Huh? So, Dr. Raj, you are saying 1 comes off, I have 3 left in my haemoglobin, there is 75% and that is equivalent to a PO2 of 40? Yep, amazing. That is still lot of oxygen on your haemoglobin, isn’t it? Mm-hmm. And that is still... you call that deoxygenated? Yes, you do. That oxygen is being consumed by the tissue to do what? Daily activity. How about just to breathe, huh? Daily activity. And in the mean time, if that oxygen allows for you to go through aerobic glycosis, TC cycle, electron transfer chain and you are producing... you are producing carbon dioxide. There you go.

    00:50 Now, we go to systemic veins. Systemic veins, there carbon dioxide is being added to my 40 to give you 46. Are we clear? The ratio of carbon dioxide production at the level of tissue to oxygen consumption at the level of the tissue. It makes no sense for you to say there is oxygen consumption at the lung. All you are doing at the lung is to deliver the oxygen for Pete’s sakes. I will give you accept the carbon dioxide, but that statement right here, do you understand that? Consumption and production at the level of tissue.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Approach to Acid Base Status: Step 3 (cont'd) – Laboratory Diagnostics by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Pulmonary Diagnostics.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Respiratory acidosis with chronically increased bicarbonate.
    2. Respiratory acidosis with acutely increased bicarbonate.
    3. Respiratory alkalosis with chronically increased bicarbonate.
    4. Metabolic alkalosis due to acute increased bicarbonate.
    5. Respiratory acidosis due to chronically decreased bicarbonate.
    1. Increased pH, decreased PCO2, decreased bicarbonate.
    2. Decreased pH, decreased PCO2, decreased bicarbonate.
    3. Increased pH, decreased PCO2, increased bicarbonate.
    4. Increased pH, increased PCO2, decreased bicarbonate.
    5. Increased pH, increased PCO2, increased bicarbonate.

    Author of lecture Approach to Acid Base Status: Step 3 (cont'd) – Laboratory Diagnostics

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


    Customer reviews

    (1)
    5,0 of 5 stars
    5 Stars
    5
    4 Stars
    0
    3 Stars
    0
    2 Stars
    0
    1  Star
    0