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Vestibulo—Ocular Reflex (VOR)

by Craig Canby, PhD
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    There is a reflex that’s important for you to understand. This is the vestibulo-ocular reflex, abbreviated V–O–R. The vestibulo-ocular reflex, what happens here is if your head moves to the right, for example, and your eyes would remain fixated on the object that you’re initially at, this will allow even as you’re moving your head to the right, for example, that your eyes will remain fixated on the object back to your left. So if your head’s moving to the right, your eyes have to move together back to the left to maintain that visual field. This is a reflex that is composed of three neurons. So what is a three neuronal circuit? So let’s explore this. Let’s look at some of the neurons that are involved in this circuitry and look at what muscles have to be activated in order for this to work appropriately. The first thing to set up here is, we have a posterior view. We’re looking at the back of the head of this particular individual. We’re also looking at the brain stem and even the spinal cord in a posterior view. So the right nuclei that we see here at multiple levels, these are on the right side as this is the back of the head being on the right. Then the nuclei that we see here are associated on the posterior left in this particular view. We’re going to have this individual move their head to the right and again the eyes will want to move back to the left. So what circuits have to be activated in order to have this reflex occur appropriately or normally? The first consideration here is that as you move your head, you’re going to disrupt the vestibular hair cells so that they start to fire. So...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Vestibulo—Ocular Reflex (VOR) by Craig Canby, PhD is from the course Auditory System and Vestibular System.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Vestibular ganglion
    2. Celiac ganglion
    3. Ciliary ganglion
    4. Otic ganglion
    5. Spiral ganglion
    1. Ipsilateral Oculomotor and contralateral Abducens
    2. Ipsilateral Oculomotor and ipsilateral Abducens
    3. Ipsilateral trochlear and contralateral Abducens
    4. Contralateral Oculomotor and ipsilateral Abducens
    5. Ipsilateral Oculomotor and contralateral Trochlear
    1. If the head moves left, both eyes will move to the right.
    2. If the head moves left, both eyes will move to the left.
    3. If the head moves right, left eye stays stable and right eye will move to the right.
    4. If the head moves right, both eyes will move to the right.
    5. If the head moves left, right eye will move to the right and left eye will move to the left.

    Author of lecture Vestibulo—Ocular Reflex (VOR)

     Craig Canby, PhD

    Craig Canby, PhD


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