Lectures

Testicular Torsion

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    Next topic is torsion of the testicle. Let me tell you right off the bat that this is an emergency. And let me give you a patient here. Perhaps you a have male on a motorcycle and get’s into an accident and he falls of the bike, and the way that he lands or whatnot then causes torsion, okay? So if there’s torsion now that’s taking place, then now what happens is the fact that – My goodness gracious, you’ve lost blood supply and on top of that, there’s a lack of drainage. And if you don’t get in there and surgically correct this, you, the patient, who’s suffering from this will lose your testicle, okay? So now that you’ve understood the importance of it, let’s get into the specifics. Urologic emergency, requiring correction within 6 hours. That, you have to know. If not, then you’re worried about risking the loss of your testicle. It is a congestion type. Why? Because torsion, when you twist the spermatic cord and company, then you’re going to block drainage. Ischemia, due to twisting of the spermatic cord, compressing the vasculature. Not only to the testicle, but then also the vas. Neonatal torsion is most common on extravaginal process as a result of the tunica vaginalis not being well-fixed to the scrotum wall. Make sure you know about two types of torsions here with ages. Neonatal, most common will be called extravaginal, to scrotal wall. The torsion involves the entire testicle, the tunica vaginalis. Now, it is a distinct entity from testicular torsion in older patients. Let’s walk through this patient. Two populations for testicular torsion in which you would then call this intravaginal. But when you say vaginal in a male, do you understand what we’re referring to? Okay. There’s no – This...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Testicular Torsion by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Male Reproductive System Diseases.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Acute scrotal condition
    2. Mainly affects neonates
    3. Always follows trauma
    4. Most of the time it is associated with testicular hemorrhage.
    5. Mainly affects adults
    1. Treatment with manual reduction is usually sufficient.
    2. Treatment usually is surgical exploration and correction.
    3. Extravaginal testicular torsion is common in neonates.
    4. Intravaginal testicular torsion is common in adults.
    5. Testicular torsion is common in young adults.
    1. Involve the torsion of testicle and tunica vaginalis.
    2. Involve the torsion of testicle within tunica vaginalis.
    3. Involve the torsion of testicle without tunica vaginalis.
    4. Common in adults
    5. Common in elderly

    Author of lecture Testicular Torsion

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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