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Main Pathways and Endogenous/Exogenous Antigens – Antigen Processing and Presentation

by Peter Delves, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Main Pathways and Endogenous/Exogenous Antigens – Antigen Processing and Presentation by Peter Delves, PhD is from the course Adaptive Immune System. It contains the following chapters:

    • The Main Pathways of Antigen Processing
    • Endogenous Antigen Processing and Presentation
    • Exogenous Antigen Processing and Presentation

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Invariant chain (Ii)
    2. TAP1
    3. Erp57
    4. CLIP
    5. Tapasin
    1. Endogenous creates peptides that are 8-9 amino acids long for MHC Class I Exogenous creates peptides that are approximately 15 amino acids long for MHC Class II
    2. Endogenous creates peptides that are 8-9 amino acids long for MHC Class II Exogenous creates peptides that are approximately 15 amino acids long for MHC Class I
    3. Endogenous creates peptides that are 15 amino acids long for MHC Class I Exogenous creates peptides that are approximately 8-9 amino acids long for MHC Class II
    4. Endogenous creates peptides that are 15 amino acids long for MHC Class II Exogenous creates peptides that are approximately 8-9 amino acids long for MHC Class I
    5. Endogenous creates peptides that are 8-9 amino acids long for MHC Class I and MHC Class II Exogenous creates peptides that are approximately 15 amino acids long for MHC Class II
    1. It marks the protein so that the proteasome can recognize it
    2. It inactivates the protein
    3. It allows the cell to recognize the protein as an antigen
    4. It allows for peptide formation
    5. It prepares the protein for presentation on the MHC Class I molecule
    1. Immunoproteasomes break down proteins into peptides of a specific length
    2. Immunoproteasomes are always present in every cell
    3. Immunoproteasomes do not recognize proteins that have been ubiquitinated
    4. Immunoproteasomes do not recognize self proteins
    5. Immunoproteasomes can only process viral proteins
    1. Transport process peptides out of the cytoplasm, through the endoplasmic reticulum, to be presented by the MHC Class I molecule
    2. Transport peptides from the cytoplasm to the immunoproteasome
    3. Form the nonpolymorphic region of the MHC Class I molecule
    4. Break down proteins that have been ubiquitinated
    5. Process proteins into peptides with the correct amount of amino acids

    Author of lecture Main Pathways and Endogenous/Exogenous Antigens – Antigen Processing and Presentation

     Peter Delves, PhD

    Peter Delves, PhD


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