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Hydrogen Bonds – How Atoms Come Together to Form a Molecule

by Georgina Cornwall, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Hydrogen Bonds – How Atoms Come Together to Form a Molecule by Georgina Cornwall, PhD is from the course Introduction to Cell Biology.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Hydrogen bond forces are stronger than most of the covalent bonds found in the biomolecules.
    2. Covalent and ionic bonds are stronger than the hydrogen bonds.
    3. Hydrogen bonds are attractive intermolecular forces between the partially positive hydrogen atom of one molecule and a partially negative electronegative atom of another molecule.
    4. Hydrogen bonds are of two types: intramolecular and intermolecular.
    5. Hydrogen bonding in water makes it an excellent solvent for the biological systems.
    1. The hydrogen bonding between the polar water molecules helps them to bring together as a liquid.
    2. The strong covalent bonds within the water molecules participate in liquefication at room temperature.
    3. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds participate in the liquefication of water molecules.
    4. The stronger molecular moments help the water to exist as a liquid at room temperature.
    5. The strong ionic bonds between two water molecules keep them together as a liquid.

    Author of lecture Hydrogen Bonds – How Atoms Come Together to Form a Molecule

     Georgina Cornwall, PhD

    Georgina Cornwall, PhD


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    Hydrogen Bonds – How Atoms Come Together to Form a Molecule
    By Saied Mostafa M. on 09. February 2018 for Hydrogen Bonds – How Atoms Come Together to Form a Molecule

    Well done by the professor with full of transfer sense.