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Clinical Correlation: Superficial Temporal Arteritis and Carotid Artery Disease – Carotid and Subclavian Arteries

by Craig Canby, PhD
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    00:00 Now, for a clinical correlation, this clinical correlation relates to the superficial temporal artery. There is a condition referred to as superficial temporal arteritis. In this condition, the superficial temporal artery is going to be inflamed. When it becomes inflamed, it will have some associated symptoms. One of the symptoms of this inflammatory state is a throbbing headache on the involved site. So here, we’re looking at the left superficial temporal artery So if this is the inflamed artery then that throbbing headache will be on the left side.

    00:43 The other symptom that can be associated with this clinical condition is the scalp on the involved side can have increased tenderness, so it’s very sensitive to touch because of the inflammatory state. Another clinical correlation to be aware of is carotid artery disease. So in this particular clinical situation, we’re looking at atherosclerotic build up.

    01:19 If there is substantial narrowing and then ultimately complete stenosis of the carotid artery, that can result in stroke symptoms. So that could be a thrombus that forms that completely obstructs the carotid artery system. It might be an embolus that would then occlude the atherosclerotic narrowing. Some of the symptoms then in this situation could include sudden numbness or weakness. This would typically be ipsilateral on the same side. A patient may have difficulty speaking. There may be associated visual disturbances.

    02:06 Patient may have episodes of sudden dizziness. There may be sudden, severe headaches, again when this becomes very severe.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Clinical Correlation: Superficial Temporal Arteritis and Carotid Artery Disease – Carotid and Subclavian Arteries by Craig Canby, PhD is from the course Head and Neck Anatomy. It contains the following chapters:

    • Superficial Temporal Arteritis
    • Carotid Artery Disease

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. There is scalp tenderness on the involved side.
    2. It arises due to inflammation of deep temporal artery.
    3. A throbbing headache occurs on the contralateral side.
    4. It most commonly occurs in early childhood.
    5. There is scalp tenderness on the contralateral side.
    1. Stroke
    2. Facial nerve palsy
    3. Hearing loss
    4. Atrophy of parotid gland
    5. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    Author of lecture Clinical Correlation: Superficial Temporal Arteritis and Carotid Artery Disease – Carotid and Subclavian Arteries

     Craig Canby, PhD

    Craig Canby, PhD


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