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Chronic Granulomatous Disease, Myeloperoxidase & Arachidonic Acid – Inflammation and Wound Repair

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    Comparison chart between chronic granulomatous disease and myeloperoxidase. We'll take a look at two different enzymes. And what may then happen when there is a deficiency to begin with. Chronic granulomatous disease, what enzyme are you missing please? NADPH oxidase only. The only cell to be then damaged or injured would be the functioning of a neutrophil. Your patient is now catalase positive susceptible. You know why already. Because now with NADPH oxidase deficiency. In CGD you do not have deficiency of myeloperoxidase. So if you have a catalase negative organism such as Strep, it's feeding us. Let's say that I have CGD, it would be feeding me the hydrogen peroxide and myeloperoxidase will kill the Strep. But a Staph which is catalase positive, even if it's feeding me to hydrogen peroxide, because the bacteria contains catalase it won't get killed. X-linked recessive for CGD. Myeloperoxidase, autosomal recessive. And CGD, absence of your NADPH oxidase, in myeloperoxidase deficiency, only deficiency of myeloperoxidase. Let me ask you something here. Which one of these conditions is more dangerous. NADPH oxidase deficiency or myeloperoxidase deficiency. You must know, clinically significant, NADPH oxidase deficiency, CGD, much more dangerous clinically than this myeloperoxidase deficiency. Respiratory burst, remember. NADPH oxidase is the first enzyme that will take the oxygen and turn into what? Superoxide. This is called a respiratory burst. This is not happening in CGD. What about hydrogen peroxide? It is absent in CGD but it's present in myeloperoxidase deficiency. And in which one of this condition would there be loss of bleach or hypochlorous acid? In both. Meaning to say that if NADPH oxidase is not present, that means that you would not be then properly, you can't form hydrogen peroxide. And so therefore you can't have bleach. If there is myeloperoxidase deficiency, yes...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Chronic Granulomatous Disease, Myeloperoxidase & Arachidonic Acid – Inflammation and Wound Repair by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Cellular Pathology: Basic Principles.


    Author of lecture Chronic Granulomatous Disease, Myeloperoxidase & Arachidonic Acid – Inflammation and Wound Repair

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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