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Alcohol and Delirium

by Helen Farrell, MD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Alcohol and Delirium by Helen Farrell, MD is from the course Control Disorders. It contains the following chapters:

    • Alcohol
    • How to Treat Alcohol Related Disorders
    • Delerium Tremens

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Alcoholic mania
    2. Minor withdrawal
    3. Withdrawal seizures
    4. Alcoholic hallucinations
    5. Delirium tremens
    1. Glutamate
    2. Serotonin
    3. ACH
    4. NMDA
    5. GABA
    1. It inhibits glutamate, thus causing sedation
    2. Alcohol dehydrogenase converts alcohol to acetyl aldehyde
    3. Asians tend to have facial flushing and nausea due to deficiency of aldehyde dehydrogenase
    4. Age, sex, weight and speed of consumption, determine the absorption and elimination rates of alcohol in an individual
    5. The legal limit for intoxication in the United States is 80-100 mg/dl
    1. 0.4–0.5%
    2. 0.1–0.2%
    3. 0.3–0.4%
    4. 1–2%
    5. 2–3%
    1. PESQ (Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire)
    2. AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test)
    3. MAST (Michigan Alcohol Screening Test)
    4. ADI (adolescent Drinking Inventory)
    5. CAGE questionnaire
    1. Assess airway, breathing and circulation
    2. Finger stick glucose
    3. Administer Thiamine and Naloxone
    4. Start chlordiazepoxide
    5. Start IV insulin and glucose
    1. Alcohol Anonymous
    2. Disulfiram
    3. Naltrexone
    4. Psychotherapy
    5. Chlordiazepoxide
    1. It inhibits the mu opioid receptors
    2. It is used as an aversion therapy leading to negative conditioning when the patient takes alcohol
    3. It inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase
    4. It has a terrible reaction when taken along with alcohol causing facial flushing and nausea
    5. Side effects include metallic taste, flushing, headache, tachycardia and nausea
    1. It is the most serious form off alcohol withdrawal
    2. Begins within 24 hours of cessation of drinking
    3. The patient experiences auditory hallucinations
    4. Fine resting tremors can be seen
    5. Tapering doses of antipsychotics show the best response

    Author of lecture Alcohol and Delirium

     Helen Farrell, MD

    Helen Farrell, MD


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