Lectures

Probability Models

by David Spade, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Probability Models by David Spade, PhD is from the course Statistics Part 1. It contains the following chapters:

    • Probability Models
    • The 10% Rule
    • The Binomial Model
    • Using the Normal Approximation
    • Statistical Significance

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. A Bernoulli trial has two possible outcomes.
    2. A Bernoulli trial can have up to five possible outcomes.
    3. The probability of success may be different from trial to trial.
    4. The probability of each possible outcome in a Bernoulli trial is the same.
    1. The probability that the first head is on the fourth flip is 0.0864.
    2. The probability that the first head is on the fourth flip is 0.4293.
    3. The probability that the first head is on the fourth flip is 0.6425.
    4. The probability that the first head is on the fourth flip is 0.
    1. The probability of getting 2 heads in 10 flips is 0.120932.
    2. The probability of getting 2 heads in 10 flips is 0.002687.
    3. The probability of getting 2 heads in 10 flips is 0.2.
    4. The probability of getting 2 heads in 10 flips is 0.
    1. The probability that the number of heads is between 30 and 45 is 0.82567.
    2. The probability that the number of heads is between 30 and 45 is 0.31653.
    3. The probability that the number of heads is between 30 and 45 is 1.
    4. The probability that the number of heads is between 30 and 45 is 0.256238.
    1. The normal approximation, as described in Chapter 14, can be used to find the probability that we see a particular number of successes as well as a range of numbers of successes.
    2. In order to use the normal approximation, we need to have the expected number of successes and the expected number of failures each exceed 10.
    3. In order to use the normal approximation to the binomial model, the conditions of the binomial model must be satisfied.
    4. A problem with the normal approximation comes from trying to approximate the distribution of a discrete random variable using a continuous distribution.

    Author of lecture Probability Models

     David Spade, PhD

    David Spade, PhD


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