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Introduction to Probability

by David Spade, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Introduction to Probability by David Spade, PhD is from the course Statistics Part 1. It contains the following chapters:

    • Introduction to Probability
    • Modeling Probability
    • The Complement Rule
    • Independent Events
    • Probability Pitfalls

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. In a random phenomenon, the possible outcomes of a trial are known, but it is unknown what will happen on any particular trial.
    2. In a random phenomenon, it is known what will happen on any given trial.
    3. In a random phenomenon, the possible outcomes of a trial are unknown.
    4. In a random phenomenon, the possible outcomes of a trial are known, and it is also known what will happen on each trial.
    1. If an event A has probability 0.9, and it has not occurred in the first 10 trials of a random phenomenon, it is sure to occur on the 11 th.
    2. In order for the Law of Large Numbers to apply, each trial must be carried out independently.
    3. If we repeat a random phenomenon over and over again, the relative frequency of the occurrence of a particular outcome or event settles around the probability of an event.
    4. The Law of Large numbers applies only to long-run relative frequencies.
    1. If A and B are two events, then P (A) + P (B) must be smaller than 1.
    2. If the probability of an event is 0, the event never occurs.
    3. If the probability of an event is 1, the event always occurs.
    4. If S is the sample space, then P ( S ) = 1.
    1. The probability that none of these events happens is 0.2.
    2. The probability that none of these events happens is 0.8.
    3. The probability that none of these events happens is 0.
    4. The probability that none of these events happens is 1.
    1. If A and B are disjoint events, the probability that both of them occur can be found by multiplying P(A) and P(B).
    2. If A and B are independent, the probability that both occur can be found by multiplying P(A) and P(B).
    3. If A and B are disjoint events, the probability that one of them occurs can be found by adding P(A) and P(B).
    4. If A and B are disjoint events, they can be independet as well.

    Author of lecture Introduction to Probability

     David Spade, PhD

    David Spade, PhD


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