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Lymphadenopathy: Reed-Sternberg Cells – White Blood Cell Pathology

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    Upon morphology of Hodgkin lymphoma, what you want to do is with this illustration or these illustrations, you compare these with the previous discussion that we had on the table, where you have the different types of morphology of what? The topic for this entire section is morphology of Reed-Sternberg cell. You must find the Reed-Sternberg cell so that you can do what? Diagnose Hodgkin. If you do not find an owl eye type of appearance upon histology and your patient has B symptoms. What do B symptoms mean to you? Night sweats, weight loss and you have fever. Sounds an awful lot like TB, but B symptoms could be found both on Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin. Reed-Sternberg cell, only Hodgkin. The classic type, take a look at this. And it looks like owl eyes, doesn’t it? You have the nucleoli which is looking right back at you. Then you have the lacunar type. I want you to pay closer attention to the lacunar and the one that you’re paying attention to is the one in the upper left corner. And you find a lot more space or vacuolization, that’s a lacunar type. Remember that classic and lacunar could be found with the sclerosing type of Hodgkin, being the most common. And I want you to move down to the mononuclear. With the mononuclear, what looks like a mononucleus and, in addition, the mononuclear variant will be found with mixed more so cellularity type of Hodgkin, M and M. And then bottom right, you find your popcorn cells or L&H (lymphocytic and histiocytic) and this type of Reed-Sternberg cell will be found with nodular lymphocyte predominant type. Four different variants of Reed-Sternberg cell. If I were you, I’d be very comfortable with being able to identify each one of these types...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Lymphadenopathy: Reed-Sternberg Cells – White Blood Cell Pathology by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Lymphadenopathy – White Blood Cell Pathology (WBC).


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Nodular lymphocyte predominant type
    2. Mixed cellularity
    3. Nodular sclerosing
    4. Lymphocyte rich
    5. Lymphocyte depleted
    1. … abundant pale cytoplasm and two or more oval lobulated nuclei containing prominent owl eye eosinophilic nucleoli.
    2. … abundant pale cytoplasm and two or more circular lobulated nuclei containing prominent owl eye basophilic nucleoli.
    3. … scarce pale cytoplasm with one or more semicircular portions removed from the cell marginand a prominent owl eye basophilic nucleoli.
    4. …scarce pale cytoplasm and one oval lobulated nucleus containing prominent owl eye basophilic nucleoli.
    5. …abundant pale cytoplasm with one or more semicircular portions removed from the cell margin and a prominent owl eye eosinophilic nucleoli.
    1. …two or more lymph nodes on both sides of the diaphragm
    2. … one lymph node on the same side of diaphragm
    3. …two lymph nodes on same side of the diaphragm
    4. …one lymph node each on both sides of the diaphragm
    5. …two lymph nodes on same side of the diaphragm along with extra nodal involvement
    1. CD20, CD45
    2. CD11, CD91
    3. CD3, CD117
    4. CD15, CD30
    5. CD34, CD41

    Author of lecture Lymphadenopathy: Reed-Sternberg Cells – White Blood Cell Pathology

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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