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Modes of Ventilation: Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    00:00 Let's take a look at another type. Now, all these names that you see here, allow it to speak to you. IMV means intermittent mandatory ventilation. So what does this mean? Well I want you take a look at the graph yet once again. On the X-axis, represents time, concepts first. On the Y-axis, is the volume. What does that mean? Well, the more volume that you put in your lung, you tell me what the patient is doing. Good. Inspiration, isn’t it? That is volume. In the mean time, all the pressure be doing in the in-vivo, inside the patient.

    00:38 It will be negative pressure which will then be the trigger for air to come in. You understand how important it was, for you to make sure that you understood your physio there. You as a clinician, wish to help your patient, assisted control. So therefore, you are going to introduce what? Good. Positive pressure. Now, the SIMV that you see on the graph means synchronous intermittent mandatory ventilation. And what this represents that ever so often after a certain number of breaths intermittently, there is going to be air that you are going to introduce to your patient and hence, increase the amount of ventilation that you then wish to provide for your patient. Keep it simple, at this point. At least lay down the foundation.

    01:24 You’ll notice the big spikes that you see here in the graph are the ventilator breaths.

    01:31 The little humps that you see there, the little mounts in between the spikes represents the patient breath. So, this means that this is a patient who requires, assistance. Welcome to intermittent or synchronous intermittent mandatory ventilation. Be familiar with the terminology, it will come in extremely handy for you so that you are not lost when you are reading a clinical vignette.

    01:57 Let's continue. Okay. Now, what is this pressure support? Well, we have two different


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Modes of Ventilation: Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Respiratory Failures.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. The patient is given one ventilator breath, then followed by 3 breaths taken by the patient. The next cycle again constitutes a ventilator breath and 3 patient breaths. The same cycle is continued.
    2. The patient is given one ventilator breath, then followed by 3 breaths taken by the patient. Next cycle patient takes 5 breaths and then one ventilator breath from assisted ventilation device and cycle continues.
    3. A ventilator breath can be given at any point between the patient breaths.
    4. The patient takes a breath at a constant rate.
    5. A ventilator breath is given initially after 2 patient breaths, followed by, a ventilator breath given after 3 patient breath. Then, a ventilator breath was given after 4 patient breaths. This pattern of intermittent ventilation is continued.
    1. On the graph, there is a dip seen at every ventilator breath.
    2. The graph is a time versus volume graph.
    3. The ventilation breath has more volume than the patient breath.
    4. A ventilator breath is given at regular intervals after patient breaths.
    5. On a graph, a ventilator breath appears as a spike and patient breath appears as a mound.

    Author of lecture Modes of Ventilation: Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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