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Lymphadenopathy: Hodgkin Lymphoma (Hodgkin's Disease) – White Blood Cell Pathology

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    Our topic now brings us to Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Whenever you deal with Hodgkin lymphoma, you should be thinking and contrasting non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). There are some general features with Hodgkin that do not exist with non-Hodgkin that you need to be quite familiar with. And that entire category of NHL or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma was quite important for us. With Hodgkin, presents in a single lymph node or several adjacent lymph node. The type of spread that you find with Hodgkin is called contiguous. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, it will be non-contiguous, more common. In Hodgkin, it's confined to lymph node with little extranodal component. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, you’d find there to be extranodal involvement to be quite common. In Hodgkin, spreads in a contiguous fashion. What does that mean? From one node to adjacent lymph node. Maybe from the mediastinum to the cervical lymph node. However with non-Hodgkin, it will be non-contiguous. With Hodgkin, we have absolutely, the most important point, histologically you must find a particular B-cell lymphoma or B-cell, excuse me. In that particular B-cell, I will show you patterns, morphologically, of Reed-Sternberg cell. In pathology, we call this owl eyes. And when the time is right, I’ll walk you through different types of Reed-Sternberg. If you do not find Reed-Sternberg cell, either in description or upon histology, you cannot diagnose your patient with Hodgkin. Etiologies: Little is known. However, Reed-Sternberg cells show evidence of EBV infection oftentimes. Well, I will walk you through different types of Hodgkin, and I will also give you what the most common type would be. One would be called nodular sclerosing and the other type would be mixed cellular. Our focus will be on those 2. Your focus really should be on nodular sclerosing as you shall see. But there is evidence of EBV, very...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Lymphadenopathy: Hodgkin Lymphoma (Hodgkin's Disease) – White Blood Cell Pathology by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Lymphadenopathy – White Blood Cell Pathology (WBC).


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. … in single lymph node along with little extranodal component.
    2. … in a single lymph node along with no extranodal component.
    3. … in multiple lymph nodes along with excessive extranodal component.
    4. … in multiple lymph nodes along with no extranodal component.
    5. … in multiple lymph nodes along with little extranodal component.
    1. Stage I or II
    2. Stage III
    3. Stage III or IV
    4. Stage IV
    5. Stage V
    1. Nodular lymphocyte predominant
    2. Lymphocyte depleted
    3. Nodular sclerosis
    4. Lymphocyte-rich
    5. Mixed cellularity
    1. Nodular lymphocyte predominant
    2. Nodular sclerosis
    3. Mixed cellularity
    4. Lymphocyte-rich
    5. Lymphocyte depleted
    1. Stage III or IV
    2. Stage II
    3. Stage III
    4. Stage I or II
    5. Stage V

    Author of lecture Lymphadenopathy: Hodgkin Lymphoma (Hodgkin's Disease) – White Blood Cell Pathology

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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