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Comparing Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic mRNA

by Georgina Cornwall, PhD
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    00:00 will go ahead and do the jobs that they do now that they are attached to the DNA. The bottom line here is we no longer think that we have to unwind the helix in order to access the base pairs. We can see that many of these enzymes and protein regulatory factors that are involved in transcription can actually bind to the DNA while it is in its helical form and in fact that helical form helps the binding of the proteins.

    00:27 Now let us take a look at the fundamental difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic messenger RNA. Recall that prokaryotic genes often have genes in sequence beyond one promoter and those genes in sequence will end up producing a messenger RNA that codes for three different proteins. We call these polycistronic messenger RNA. Each messenger RNA has multiple proteins that it could make. Whereas in eukaryotic cells, we generally have one gene or we do have one gene on the messenger RNA. We have a three prime and a five prime untranslated region on either side of it, but one protein coding region and so those are monocistronic. Polycistronic versus monocistronic of course leads to different regulatory mechanisms.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Comparing Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic mRNA by Georgina Cornwall, PhD is from the course Gene Regulation.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. DNA-binding motifs into the major groove of the double helix where the edges of the nitrogen bases protrude.
    2. RNA polymerase into the major groove of the double helix where the edges of the nitrogen bases protrude.
    3. DNA-binding motifs into the minor groove of the double helix where the edges of the nitrogen bases protrude.
    4. RNA promoters into either the major groove or the minor groove of the double helix where the edges of the nitrogen bases protrude.
    1. …prokaryotes.
    2. …eukaryotes.
    3. …fungi.
    4. …plants.
    5. …animals.

    Author of lecture Comparing Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic mRNA

     Georgina Cornwall, PhD

    Georgina Cornwall, PhD


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