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Baroreflex & Baroreceptor Function Alteration, Resetting & Adaptation – Regulation of Ambulatory Blood Pressure (ABP)

by Thad Wilson, PhD
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    Now, let's talk through this example one more time looking at a fallen blood pressure. I think it's helpful to go through these examples because it brings this process home a little bit more to understand what responses we should be getting to something like a fallen blood pressure. So if you have a decrease in blood pressure, you'll become hypotensive. What's going to happen? You notice this fallen blood pressure, therefore there is some reason why there is a change or a change needed in systemic vascular resistance. So you need to increase SVR. This causes also a venoconstriction so you decrease blood flow to the various systemic circulatory organs, you venoconstrict to squeeze more blood back to the heart. This increases venous preload, this increases the strength of contraction through two mechanisms. One is through direct involvement of the sympathetic nervous system and the baroreflex to increase inotropy but also the increase in the preload will also cause more stretch of the heart to get it to contract harder. Finally, through the cardiac stimulatory or acceleratory region you'll get an increase in heart rate. Hopefully, all those things are enough to bring blood pressure back to normal. So you're operating on this principle of working on the factors that affect blood pressure, cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance. There are a number of factors that alter the function of the baroreflex. Exercise is one. So once you engage in exercise or aerobic exercise specifically, you need to reset the baroreflex to a different level. Why? Because pressures are going to be different. Just because your blood pressure is high during exercise doesn't mean you also have to not be able to respond to a change in blood pressure. So by resetting the baroreflex, it gives us that ability...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Baroreflex & Baroreceptor Function Alteration, Resetting & Adaptation – Regulation of Ambulatory Blood Pressure (ABP) by Thad Wilson, PhD is from the course Vascular Physiology.


    Author of lecture Baroreflex & Baroreceptor Function Alteration, Resetting & Adaptation – Regulation of Ambulatory Blood Pressure (ABP)

     Thad Wilson, PhD

    Thad Wilson, PhD


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