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Testing Hypotheses about Proportions

by David Spade, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Testing Hypotheses about Proportions by David Spade, PhD is from the course Statistics Part 2. It contains the following chapters:

    • Testing Hypotheses About Proportions
    • The Success/Failure Condition
    • P-Values
    • Significance Levels
    • Pitfalls to Avoid

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. We set up our null hypothesis in such a way that it states that no change has taken place, and we try to let the data convince us otherwise.
    2. We set up our null hypothesis as the thing we want to conclude, and we let the data support this belief.
    3. We set up our null hypothesis in such a way that it states that no change has taken place, and we let the data support this belief.
    4. We set up our null hypothesis as the thing we want to conclude, and we look to the data to convince us that the null hypothesis is true.
    1. The p-value is the probability of seeing data like what we saw, or even something more extreme, if the null hypothesis is true.
    2. The p-value tells us the probability that the null hypothesis is true.
    3. The p-value is the probability of seeing data like what we saw, or even something more extreme, if the alternative hypothesis is true.
    4. The p-value provides a measure of the strength of the evidence against the alternative hypothesis.
    1. Our data do not need to be random.
    2. We need to expect at least 10 successes under the null hypothesis.
    3. The expected number of failures under the null hypothesis must be at least 10.
    4. The sample size must be no larger than 10% of the population.
    1. We do not report the value of the z-statistic.
    2. We do not report the decision.
    3. We do not report the conclusion.
    4. We do not report the p-value.
    1. It is good hypothesis testing practice to check the conditions for the test before using it to make general statements about the population.
    2. It is good hypothesis testing practice to base your hypotheses on what you see in the data.
    3. It is good hypothesis testing practice to make your null hypothesis what you want to show to be true.
    4. It is good hypothesis testing practice to say that you accept the null hypothesis.

    Author of lecture Testing Hypotheses about Proportions

     David Spade, PhD

    David Spade, PhD


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