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Introduction to Statistics

by David Spade, PhD
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      Foliensatz 01 Statistic Spade.pdf
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      Foliensatz 06 Introduction To Statistics Spade.pdf
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Introduction to Statistics by David Spade, PhD is from the course Statistics Part 1. It contains the following chapters:

    • Introduction to Statistics
    • Types of Variables
    • Displaying Categorical Data
    • Bad Charts

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Statistics is the science of collecting data and analyzing variation.
    2. Statistics is the science of displaying and summarizing data.
    3. Statistics is the science of making predictions about future phenomena.
    4. Statistics is the science of gathering information.
    1. The “Who” refers to the group on which measurements are being collected.
    2. The “Who” refers to who is collecting the data.
    3. The “Who” refers to the audience to whom the results of the study will be presented.
    4. The “Who” refers to the individual(s) that proposed the study.
    1. The height of the tree is quantitative because the value we are measuring is the actual height, which has a meaningful numerical interpretation.
    2. The height is a categorical variable because the height of a tree can be put into categories.
    3. The height of a tree is quantitative because its height cannot be put into categories.
    4. The height of the tree is categorical because the measurement of the height has no meaningful numerical interpretation.
    1. Bar charts, frequency tables and pie charts are all appropriate ways to summarize categorical data.
    2. A bar chart is an appropriate way to summarize categorical data.
    3. A frequency table is an appropriate way to summarize categorical data.
    4. A pie chart is an appropriate way to summarize categorical data.
    1. The religious affiliation of a person is a categorical variable.
    2. The age of a person is a categorical variable.
    3. The IQ of a person is a categorical variable.
    4. The weight of a person is a categorical variable.

    Author of lecture Introduction to Statistics

     David Spade, PhD

    David Spade, PhD


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