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Confidence Intervals for Proportions

by David Spade, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Confidence Intervals for Proportions by David Spade, PhD is from the course Statistics Part 2. It contains the following chapters:

    • Confidence Intervals for Proportions
    • Constructing the Interval
    • Margin of Error
    • Assumptions and Conditions
    • Pitfalls to Avoid

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. We know that we have constructed an interval that captures the true pop- ulation proportion.
    2. We no longer need to rely on a single value to estimate the population proportion.
    3. We are guaranteed a certain probability that the interval captures the true value of the population parameter.
    4. We have more confidence in a range than in a single value as an estimate of the population proportion.
    1. We are 95% confident that the true population proportion is between a and b.
    2. We know that the true population proportion is between a and b.
    3. We know that the true population proportion is ˆ p .
    4. It is probably true that the population proportion is ˆp .
    1. A smaller margin of error is associated with lower confidence.
    2. A smaller margin of error is associated with higher confidence.
    3. A larger margin of error is associated with lower confidence.
    4. We can change the confidence level using the same sample size without affecting the margin of error.
    1. We need our sample size to be at least 10% of the population.
    2. We need to observe at least 10 successes.
    3. We need to observe at least 10 failures.
    4. We need our sample to be random.
    1. The confidence level can be increased while also decreasing the margin of error by increasing the sample size.
    2. The interval is based on the sample proportion, so any statements you can make based on the interval should be about the sample proportion.
    3. 95% confidence means that you are 95% certain that the population proportion lies in your interval.
    4. Values near the center of the interval are more plausible than values near the edges.

    Author of lecture Confidence Intervals for Proportions

     David Spade, PhD

    David Spade, PhD


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