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Comparing two Proportions

by David Spade, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Comparing two Proportions by David Spade, PhD is from the course Statistics Part 2. It contains the following chapters:

    • Comparing Two Proportions
    • Assumptions and Conditions
    • Hypothesis Testing
    • Snoring Example
    • Example: Mechanics and Conclusion

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. We usually do not know the population proportions, so finding the standard deviation is not possible and we have to estimate it using the standard error.
    2. The standard deviation of the difference in the proportions is simply the difference between the standard deviations of the two proportions.
    3. The standard deviation of the difference in the proportions is simply the sum of the standard deviations of the proportions.
    4. The standard error of the difference in the proportions is the sum of the standard errors of the individual proportions.
    1. The groups we are comparing are linearly related to each other.
    2. Each group’s observations are independent or are randomly selected.
    3. We need to observe at least 10 successes and 10 failures in each group.
    4. The sample sizes should not be larger than 10% of the respective population sizes.
    1. We are 95% confident that p1 - p2 is between a and b.
    2. We know that the difference between the population proportions falls between a and b.
    3. The value ˆ p 1 - ˆ p 2 is a more plausible value for the difference in the population proportions than are values near a or near b .
    4. We are 95% certain that p 1 - p 2 is between a and b .
    1. We do not know either population proportion under the null hypothesis, so we construct a pooled estimate based on the two sample proportions.
    2. The procedures described in this chapter can be used if the groups are not independent.
    3. The procedures described in this chapter can be used if the individuals in the study are not randomly sampled.
    4. We do not know either sample proportion under the null hypothesis, so we have to construct a pooled estimate based on the population proportions.
    1. Based on the data we observed, the null hypothesis is not a reasonable explanation of the behavior between the two populations.
    2. We are certain that there is a difference between the two population proportions.
    3. We are certain that there is no difference between the two population proportions.
    4. We have evidence that there is no difference between the two population proportions.

    Author of lecture Comparing two Proportions

     David Spade, PhD

    David Spade, PhD


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