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Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Bleeding: Examination & Diagnosis

by Kevin Pei, MD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Bleeding: Examination & Diagnosis by Kevin Pei, MD is from the course General Surgery.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. 3rd part of duodenum bleeding --- Lower gastrointestinal bleeding
    2. Stomach bleeding --- Upper gastrointestinal bleeding
    3. 2nd part of duodenum bleeding --- Upper gastrointestinal bleeding
    4. Jejunal bleeding --- Lower gastrointestinal bleeding
    5. Colon bleeding --- Lower gastrointestinal bleeding
    1. ..transesophageal endoscopy.
    2. ...digital rectal exam.
    3. ...colonoscopy.
    4. ...tagged RBC scan.
    5. ...mesenteric angiography.
    1. Hemorrhoids
    2. Peptic ulcer disease
    3. Diverticulosis
    4. Inflammatory bowel syndrome
    5. Crohn's disease
    1. A tagged RBC scan can localize the bleeding site efficiently if the amount of bleeding is more than .5-1 cc.
    2. A tagged RBC scan can localize the bleeding site efficiently only if the bleeding is very brisk.
    3. Mesenteric angiography is the gold standard to diagnose and localize GI bleeding.
    4. A tagged RBC scan is the gold standard to treat GI bleeding.
    5. Mesenteric angiography is more sensitive than tagged RBC scan.

    Author of lecture Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Bleeding: Examination & Diagnosis

     Kevin Pei, MD

    Kevin Pei, MD


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    A good start
    By Hamed S. on 28. March 2017 for Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Bleeding: Examination & Diagnosis

    I think it would be worthwhile to also focus on upper gi bleeding as well. Also It would extremely handy to learn about working up a patients with suspected GI, ie what investigations you would do first. Toronotes Notes has a wonderful flow chart in the Gastrointestinal chapter