Lectures

Starling Forces

by Thad Wilson, PhD
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    If we would calculate things like starling forces in the cardiovascular system, we oftentimes use this kind of equation where J is the flux, [K sub F] is a filtration coefficient, A is a surface area, [P sub C] is the hydrostatic pressure within the capillary, [P sub I] is the hydrostatic pressure within the interstitial space, sigma is the reflection coefficient, the [Pi sub C] is the oncotic pressure of the capillary, and then [Pi sub I] is the oncotic pressure within the interstitial space. So this is a very classic way of looking at how fluid travels from the blood into the interstitial space. The kidney is no different. It’s utilizing this very same principle, but we’re going to only focus on glomerular capillaries rather than capillaries that are located throughout the body. So when we break it down to glomerular capillaries, now we’re talking about glomerular filtration rate, so that’s replacing J. [K sub F] is the same. The area will be consistent, so we can factor that out. So we will have [K sub F] is the hydrostatic pressure within the glomerular capillary minus the hydrostatic pressure within Bowman’s space, or also known as the glomerular space. The [Pi sub GC] is the glomerular capillarity oncotic pressure, and then the [Pi sub BS] is the oncotic pressure within Bowman’s space, again also known as the glomerular space. So this formula works very well looking at how fluid travels across a capillary. What are the major principles or players in this? Well, the [K sub F], which is the filtration coefficient -- that’s number 1. Then we also have the hydrostatic pressures within both the capillary and within the glomerular space. The third thing that’s important is the oncotic pressures, and those would be located both...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Starling Forces by Thad Wilson, PhD is from the course Renal Physiology.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure
    2. Glomerular capillary oncotic pressure
    3. Bowman’s space hydrostatic pressure
    4. Bowman’s space oncotic pressure
    1. It increases the oncotic pressure within the glomerular capillary
    2. It decreases the hydrostatic pressure within the glomerular capillary
    3. It increases the oncotic pressure within the glomerular space
    4. It increases the hydrostatic pressure within the glomerular capillary
    5. It decreases the oncotic pressure within the glomerular capillary
    1. 11mmHg
    2. 12mmHg
    3. 15mmHg
    4. 21mmHg
    5. 17mmHg
    1. Concentration of proteins
    2. Influx of proteins to Bowman's space
    3. Influx of water to Bowman's space
    4. Dilution of proteins
    5. Influx of Plasma from Bowman's space

    Author of lecture Starling Forces

     Thad Wilson, PhD

    Thad Wilson, PhD


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