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Polymorphonuclear Cells: Eosinophils and Basophils (Nursing)

by Rhonda Lawes

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    00:01 Hey, welcome back. Let's take a look at the eosinophils.

    00:05 Now they get called that because they stain with the red dye, eosin.

    00:09 Clever, huh? Really, these guys that come up with the names could never work at a lipstick factory because, you know, they're not very creative, but that's why these cells are called eosinophils because they stain red with the dye, eosin.

    00:22 Now these are a smaller percentage of the white blood cells, normally 0-4%, right? So, see if you can recall what percentage the neutrophils are.

    00:32 Okay, if you can't, go ahead and look at your notes, but remember, they're a much larger percentage.

    00:38 Okay, we're going to look at the same drill, right? It's eosinophilia and eosinopenia.

    00:43 So you can have an excess of the eosinophils if there's an allergic reaction.

    00:48 So if I have a food allergy, like peanuts, and I take peanuts, you're going to see the eosinophils go up.

    00:53 The body feels like it's under attack because I'm allergic to that food.

    00:57 That's why you see a rise in the eosinophils.

    01:00 Now bee stings can be a much bigger deal, right? But food allergies and bee stings could be a mild reaction up to a life-threatening reaction, but you're going to see the eosinophils elevated either way.

    01:12 Parasitic infections.

    01:14 That doesn't sound like any fun, but if you have a parasite inside your body, you have an infection, you'll see a rise in your eosinophils.

    01:23 Leukemia. You're going to see leukemia come up over and over again because their lab values, their CBC numbers are way out of whack.

    01:32 Now you're going to see a rise in eosinophils when your bone marrow is hyperactive.

    01:36 Remember, we talked about low coming from bone marrow that's suppressed, but eosinophils go up higher where the bone marrow is hyperactive.

    01:44 Now, you can also have autoimmune disease or -- here's something -- polyarteritis nodosa.

    01:50 That is not something you hear every day, but it causes a vasculitis and inflammation and you'll see a rise in the eosinophils.

    01:57 Now let's look at the opposite problem, eosinopenia.

    02:01 That means low eosinophils. It's generally not a concern, but it might be an indication of some type of nutritional deficiency or excessive glucocorticoids.

    02:12 So, remember, this is the one that 0% is still within normal range for some labs.

    02:18 So pay close attention to what the normal values are listed for the lab where the lab work was processed.

    02:24 Basophils. Now, they stain with a basic dye and they're a blue color.

    02:29 Now, they are a smaller percentage of the white blood cells, normally 0-2%, right? So there's not very many of these around. Now, they are a smaller percentage of the white blood cells, normally 0-2%, right? So there's not very many of these around.

    02:37 Basophilia happens in an allergic reaction, somebody who has chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, or if they're taking oral contraception. So if you have a female patient -- and with any patient, you always want to complete a list of their medications that they're on -- but if you know that your patient's taking oral contraception, you should expect an increase in basophils.

    02:58 Now, again, basopenia is generally not a concern, but it can also be a nutritional deficiency.

    03:03 Wait a minute. This is starting to sound familiar, right? So a great way to study is to think about what else have we just talked about that a low volume of could mean a nutritional deficiency? Yeah, jot that in your notes. That will help you remember it as you're moving forward and coming back to review your notes.

    03:22 Okay, also excessive glucocorticoids.

    03:24 So I think we've pretty much established that glucocorticoids can really play with your numbers on your CBC.

    03:31 And again, we want to remind you on this value too, that 0% is within normal range, so make sure you pay close attention to the lab's particular normal range value.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Polymorphonuclear Cells: Eosinophils and Basophils (Nursing) by Rhonda Lawes is from the course Complete Blood Count (CBC) (Nursing).


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Eosinophilia
    2. Basophilia
    3. Eosinopenia
    4. Basopenia
    1. Basophilia
    2. Eosinophilia
    3. Basopenia
    4. Eosinopenia

    Author of lecture Polymorphonuclear Cells: Eosinophils and Basophils (Nursing)

     Rhonda Lawes

    Rhonda Lawes


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