Lectures

Perinatal Infections

by Veronica Gillispie, MD, FACOG
(1)

Questions about the lecture
My Notes
  • Required.
Save Cancel
    Learning Material 2
    • PDF
      Slides PerinatalInfections Obstetrics.pdf
    • PDF
      Download Lecture Overview
    Report mistake

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Perinatal Infections by Veronica Gillispie, MD, FACOG is from the course Antenatal Care. It contains the following chapters:

    • Perinatal Infections
    • Toxoplasmosis
    • Rubella
    • CMV
    • HIV
    • Syphilis

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Contact with cat feces
    2. Sharing needles
    3. Unprotected intercourse
    4. Children with chicken pox
    5. People non-immune to rubella
    1. With pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine
    2. With penicillin
    3. With penicillin only after sensitization to the antibiotic
    4. There is no treatment for toxoplasmosis during pregnancy
    5. With sulfadiazine only
    1. Chorioretinitis
    2. Hearing loss
    3. Hepatomegaly
    4. "Blueberry muffin" rash
    5. Cataracts
    1. Respiratory particles
    2. Skin contact
    3. Sexually transmitted
    4. Animal feces
    5. Unwashed fruits and vegetables
    1. There is no treatment for rubella during pregnancy.
    2. Penicillin
    3. Sensitization with penicillin, then penicillin treatment
    4. Antiviral
    5. Pyrimethamine
    1. Body fluids
    2. Skin contact
    3. Coughing/sneezing
    4. Animal feces
    5. Uncooked meats
    1. Amniotic fluid test
    2. Maternal blood test
    3. Fetal blood test
    4. There is no test for CMV; should treat empirically
    5. Dark field microscopy
    1. Seizures
    2. Cataracts
    3. Muscle atrophy
    4. Rash
    5. Hepatomegaly
    1. Start antiviral therapy at 36 weeks gestation, and delivery by cesarean section if she has any lesions at time of delivery.
    2. Start antiviral therapy from the first trimester to continue throughout pregnancy until normal vaginal delivery.
    3. Start antiviral therapy only if she has any active herpes lesions.
    4. Deliver via cesarean section no matter if lesions are visible or not.
    5. Start antiviral therapy at 24 weeks gestation, and deliver by cesarean section if she has any lesions at the time of delivery.
    1. Viral load less than 1,000
    2. Viral load less than 10,000
    3. Only if undetectable viral load
    4. Women who have HIV should only deliver via cesarean section no matter what the viral load is
    5. Viral load less than 100,000
    1. Syphilis
    2. Herpes
    3. HIV
    4. Toxoplasmosis
    5. Rubella

    Author of lecture Perinatal Infections

     Veronica Gillispie, MD, FACOG

    Veronica Gillispie, MD, FACOG


    Customer reviews

    (1)
    5,0 of 5 stars
    5 Stars
    5
    4 Stars
    0
    3 Stars
    0
    2 Stars
    0
    1  Star
    0