Lectures

Occupational Lung Disease

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Occupational Lung Disease by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Occupational Lung Diseases. It contains the following chapters:

    • Occupational Lung Diseases
    • Asbestosis
    • Asbestosis: Diagnosis
    • Berylliosis
    • Silicosis

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
    2. Occupational asthma
    3. Bronchogenic carcinoma
    4. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis
    5. Restrictive lung disease
    1. A type of occupational lung disease resulting in a restrictive pattern caused by inhalation of particles due to occupational exposure.
    2. Broad category of lung involvement as a result of environmental influence.
    3. Any disease caused by the inhalation of foreign particles during occupational exposure.
    4. The term to describe the inhalation of foreign particles during occupational exposure.
    5. A type of occupational lung disease with any pathological pattern caused by inhalation of particles due to occupational exposure.
    1. …occupational asthma.
    2. …cor pulmonale.
    3. …bronchogenic lung cancers.
    4. …mesothelioma.
    5. …Caplan syndrome.
    1. A man working as an electronics manufacturer.
    2. A man working for 20 years as a shipbuilder.
    3. A man who specializes in brake-lining mechanics.
    4. A woman working in the textile industry.
    5. A woman living next to an older building while it was demolished.
    1. Alveolar sputum sample obtained by bronchioalveolar lavage
    2. Chest computed tomography
    3. Bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy
    4. Computed tomography guided percutaneous lung biopsy
    5. Chest Radiograph
    1. Prussian blue
    2. Hematoxylin and eosin
    3. Acid fast
    4. Periodic acid-Schiff
    5. Congo red
    1. Pleural plaques
    2. Bronchogenic carcinoma
    3. Hemosiderin-laden macrophages
    4. Non-caseating granuloma
    5. Ferruginous bodies
    1. Golden brown fusiform rods with H&E stain.
    2. Cystic dilatation of air spaces lined with columnar type of epithelium.
    3. Dense eosinophilic deposits of collagen without architectural distortion.
    4. Hyaline membrane formation and fibrin deposits lining the alveolar body.
    5. Intranuclear eosinophilic inclusion body.
    1. Adenocarcinoma
    2. Small cell lung cancer
    3. Bronchioalveolar carcinoma
    4. Squamous cell carcinoma
    5. Mesothelioma
    1. Ferruginous bodies
    2. Primarily lower lobe involvement
    3. Pleural plaques
    4. Pleural effusions
    5. Calcified supradiaphragmatic nodules
    1. Asbestosis is the only known risk factor for malignant mesothelioma.
    2. It is the most common form of malignancy associated with asbestosis.
    3. It generally affects the upper region of the lungs.
    4. It is more commonly associated with the serpentine type of asbestos fibers.
    5. Pleural plaques are a common precursor to the development of mesothelioma.
    1. Acute, nodular erythematous eruptions on the lower limbs
    2. Decreased total lung capacity
    3. Occasionally responsive to glucocorticoid therapy
    4. Granulomatous histology on biopsy
    5. Hilar lymphadenopathy
    1. Asymptomatic, diagnosed incidentally
    2. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis
    3. Elevated blood pressure due to increased serum ACE levels
    4. Progressive massive fibrosis
    5. Pleural effusions
    1. Coal worker’s pneumoconiosis
    2. Berylliosis
    3. None of the answers involve the upper lobe.
    4. All of the answers involve the upper lobe.
    5. Asbestosis
    1. Electronics manufacturer
    2. Coal miner
    3. Roofer
    4. Shipbuilder
    5. Plumber
    1. Disruption of secondary lysosomes increasing the vulnerability for tuberculosis.
    2. Honeycomb lung providing cavities that form the nidus for tuberculosis infections.
    3. Calcifications and fibrosis of pleural layer increasing the risk for pleural effusions.
    4. Hilar lymphadenopathy resulting in increased risk for lymphoma.
    5. Disruption of the parietal layer of the lung increasing the risk for pleural effusions.
    1. Coal Worker’s Pneumoconiosis
    2. Silicosis
    3. Lymphoma
    4. Sarcoidosis
    5. Berylliosis
    1. Demolition worker - Asbestosis
    2. Sandblasting – Berylliosis
    3. Coal miner –Silicosis
    4. Roofers – Berylliosis
    5. Aerospace manufacturing –Asbestosis

    Author of lecture Occupational Lung Disease

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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