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Muscarinic Receptors and Drugs: In a Nutshell (Nursing)

by Rhonda Lawes

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      Slides 12-02 PNS Muscarinic Drugs.pdf
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    00:01 Let's review this section.

    00:03 Muscarinic receptors are located on your eyes, your heart, lungs, GI tract, sweat glands and urinary bladder.

    00:10 The muscarinic receptors are activated by acetylcholine and that's why they're considered cholinergic receptors.

    00:18 Cholinergic drugs enhance the effects of acetylcholine and increase the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system.

    00:26 anticholinergic drugs competitively block the effects pf acetylcholine, and then reduce the parasympathetic actions and increase sympathetic ones.

    00:35 So an effective way to study cholinergic drugs is to make sure that you understand the receptors that are involved with each particular drug.

    00:43 If the drug is an agonist or an antagonist, and you can easily remember the effects of the medication.

    00:50 Now look at bethanechol.

    00:52 It selectively activates the muscarinic receptors on the bladder.

    00:56 It's an agonist and it's used to treat urinary retention.

    01:00 Bethanechol is used in postpartum patients and in patients whose bladder has a neurogenic atony to help relieve that urinary retention.

    01:08 you wanna be careful with bethanechol even if it's likely won't happen but patients with asthma and cardiac problems, peptic ulcers or intestinal obstruction might have some problems.

    01:20 Now, stop right there.

    01:22 Based on what you know about receptors, see if you can recall why we might have a chance of a problem with a patient with each of those diagnoses.

    01:31 Work your way through asthma, cardiac, peptic ulcers and intestinal obstruction and then restart the video.

    01:40 Okay anticholinergic drugs are also known as parasympatholytic, remember? That's because they stop the parasympathetic-like response.

    01:51 So antimuscarinic drugs is another way of saying that, and so is muscarinic blocker .

    01:56 Before we go on from here, make sure you understand why all of those terms are referring to similar responses.

    02:07 Okay, so anticholinergics produces selective blockade of muscarinic receptors, not all the cholinergic receptor but they hit some of them.

    02:16 Most muscrinic receptors are on structures that are innervated by the parasympathetic nerves, that's why we can so closely align it with the parasympathetic nervous system response or a sympathetic-like response.

    02:28 Atropine is a muscarinic antagonist medication and we use it for increasing the heart rate, bradycardia when the patient is symptomatic.

    02:37 Remember if they are super strong athletes, don't go slim on atropine in them, If they're symptomatic with it, their blood pressure is too low, they feel really weird.

    02:45 or they're unconscious, that would be a time to give the medication.

    02:48 And finally, mushroom poisoning is excessive amounts of muscarinic agonist exposure, and can be treated with a muscarinic abntagonist like atropine.

    03:00 Thanks for watching our video today and we hope you survive mushroom poisoning!


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Muscarinic Receptors and Drugs: In a Nutshell (Nursing) by Rhonda Lawes is from the course Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) Medications (Nursing).


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Cholinergic drugs enhance the effects of acetylcholine to increase the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system.
    2. Cholinergic drugs decrease the effects of acetylcholine to decrease the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system.
    3. Anticholinergic drugs enhance the effects of acetylcholine to increase the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system.
    4. Anticholinergic drugs decrease the effects of acetylcholine to increase the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system.

    Author of lecture Muscarinic Receptors and Drugs: In a Nutshell (Nursing)

     Rhonda Lawes

    Rhonda Lawes


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