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Loop of Henle: Overview and Reabsorption

by Thad Wilson, PhD
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    So when we think about this loop of Henle, what we want to start thinking about is what areas are involved in the various transport. We talked a lot about the proximal tubule. In fact, the proximal tubule transports somewhere around 120 liters per day of solutes and solvent. So it’s done a lot of the work. But if we break it down in an ion-by-ion basis, how much movement actually occurs out of the proximal tubule? How much occurs out of the loop of Henle? How much occurs along the thick ascending limb, the distal convoluted tubule, and the collecting tubule? So let’s take it ion by ion and talk through each of those mechanisms. Let’s start with glucose. Glucose is primarily absorbed in the proximal convoluted tubule. In fact, 98% of all the glucose is reabsorbed by that mechanism. The 2% that’s left over is transported out of the proximal straight tubule. So you can see here, there’s going to be none or very little glucose in the urine. This is based upon that principle that we’ve discussed earlier about the transport maximum. But as long as you have a normal blood glucose level, all of your glucose will be reabsorbed. It makes a lot of sense. It took a lot to eat that food and get that glucose, you might as well keep it in the body and not get rid of it. Amino acids and peptides are dealt with in a primary and in a similar manner as glucose. About 99% of it is reabsorbed in the proximal convoluted tubule, and the other 1% is reabsorbed in the proximal straight. That, again, leaves none to be excreted in a normal healthy condition. Phosphate, another one of our anions to deal with. About 80% of it is...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Loop of Henle: Overview and Reabsorption by Thad Wilson, PhD is from the course Renal Physiology.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Proximal tubule
    2. Thick ascending limb
    3. Distal convoluted tubule
    4. Collecting tubule
    1. Thick ascending limb
    2. Proximal tubule
    3. Distal convoluted tubule
    4. Collecting tubule
    1. Proximal tubule
    2. Thick ascending limb
    3. Distal convoluted tubul
    4. Collecting tubule
    1. More than 80% of Phosphate will be reabsorbed
    2. Decrease in reabsorption of Phosphate
    3. Less than 10% of Phosphate will excrete in the urine
    4. 80% of Phosphate will be reabsorbed only
    5. Less than 80% of Phosphate is reabsorbed

    Author of lecture Loop of Henle: Overview and Reabsorption

     Thad Wilson, PhD

    Thad Wilson, PhD


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