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Epigenetic Alterations and Loss of Proteostasis

by Georgina Cornwall, PhD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Epigenetic Alterations and Loss of Proteostasis by Georgina Cornwall, PhD is from the course Aging. It contains the following chapters:

    • Epigenetic alterations
    • Loss of proteostasis

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Heritable changes in phenotype without change in genotype
    2. Changes in genotype without change in phenotype
    3. Inheritable changes in both genotype and phenotype
    4. Changes in DNA without change in chromatin state
    5. Non-inheritable changes in both phenotype and genotype
    1. Loss of proteostasis
    2. Telomere attrition
    3. Spontaneous hydrolytic reaction
    4. Apoptosis
    5. Accumulation of free radicals in the cell
    1. Changes in nucleotide sequences caused by environmental stimuli
    2. Chromatin remodeling caused by environmental stimuli
    3. Changes in patterns of methylation of DNA, altering accessibility for gene transcription
    4. Histone tail modification altering DNA accessibility for gene transcription
    5. An inheritable change in the shape of chromatin without changes to genetic material
    1. Aging cells' loss of proteostasis can lead to common medical conditions in the elderly, such as cataracts.
    2. An aging cell maintains the ability to control the amount of protein it produces.
    3. An aging cell maintains the ability to control the integrity of the protein structure it produces.
    4. Aging cells' loss of proteostasis does not affect the normal signalling between cells.
    5. Aging cell's loss of proteostasis only leads to minimal changes and does not have the potential for toxic accumulation of proteins.
    1. Epigenetic factors can influence how genes are expressed at different ages.
    2. Epigenetic factors do not change throughout our lives.
    3. Epigenetic factors do not change how genes are expressed, they only affect when they are expressed.
    4. Epigenetic alterations are prevented by histone modifications.
    5. DNA methylation patterns are permanent and never change in epigenetic alterations.

    Author of lecture Epigenetic Alterations and Loss of Proteostasis

     Georgina Cornwall, PhD

    Georgina Cornwall, PhD


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