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Effective Nuclear Charge

by Jared Rovny
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Effective Nuclear Charge by Jared Rovny is from the course Electronic Structure.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. The electrons present in the inner orbitals repel the electrons occupying the outer orbitals.
    2. Some nuclei have an effect from the neutrons in the nucleus, which causes a slightly changed charge.
    3. Each electron orbital has interference between the two different electron spins.
    4. The energy of the electron energy level can interfere with the orbit of the electron.
    5. The motion of an electron in orbit causes a slight change in its real charge due to relativity.
    1. The inherent uncertainty in observable quantities of a particle, like its position or location.
    2. The experimental uncertainty in observable quantities of a particle, due to the constant inadequacy of our measurement tools.
    3. The uncertainty about which objects we are observing when we look at minuscule structures.
    4. The uncertainty in what a particle is before it has been measured.
    5. The quantum mechanical uncertainty associated with the many types of fundamental particles and their probabilities.
    1. The wavelength of the wave.
    2. The height of the wave.
    3. The number of waves available.
    4. The square of the wave at each point.
    5. The phase of the wave.
    1. When we know its momentum (wavelength), we can no longer localize the position.
    2. When we know its location (wavelength), we can no longer constrain the momentum to a particular place.
    3. When we know its momentum (probability), we can no longer localize the wavelength (which encodes location).
    4. When we know its location (probability), we can no longer adequately measure the height of the wave.
    5. Momentum and location are fractional inverses of each other (mathematically); so that if one becomes zero, the other is unknowable.
    1. Planck’s constant is very small.
    2. Planck’s constant is very big.
    3. Planck’s constant was not measured with enough accuracy.
    4. Planck’s constant is always greater than the uncertainty, which had not been noticed before.
    5. Planck’s constant, when reduced, cannot be known without measuring the uncertainty principle.

    Author of lecture Effective Nuclear Charge

     Jared Rovny

    Jared Rovny


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