Playlist

Dopamine Agonist and SGLT-2 Inhibitors – Oral Antidiabetic Medications (Nursing)

by Rhonda Lawes

My Notes
  • Required.
Save Cancel
    Learning Material 2
    • PDF
      Slides 07-05 DiabeticMedications III Oral Antidiabetics and Non-Insulin SubQ.pdf
    • PDF
      Download Lecture Overview
    Report mistake
    Transcript

    00:01 Our seventh family are the dopamine agonist.

    00:04 Now, note Nurse Natalie at the bottom of the screen there.

    00:07 See her expression? That's to remind you.

    00:09 We're not exactly sure how these medications work.

    00:14 We know they are helpful, but we're not exactly sure how they work.

    00:17 We've just got a couple of good guesses.

    00:19 That's not uncommon in the CNS, the central nervous system.

    00:23 Even with our psych drugs and other CNS medications, it's so complex, we're not exactly clear how they work.

    00:30 But, we use this one anyway, it's bromocriptine, is what the name is, the generic name, when it's use to treat diabetes.

    00:38 Now it has other names, or aliases, when it's used to treat Parkinson's or hyperprolactinemia, which means that extra prolactin.

    00:47 So, we use the same generic compound to treat Parkinson's and hyperprolactinemia.

    00:56 So, we think it might reverse the hypothalamus' drive to raise blood glucose, and the triglycerides and the free fatty acids, but again, that's just a really good guess.

    01:06 We're not exactly sure, at this point.

    01:08 But since it messes with your CNS system, drowsiness can be a problem.

    01:13 Here's one that will get your attention.

    01:15 Remember that it works in the CNS system, it can exacerbate psychosis.

    01:21 That's a significant side effect.

    01:23 Not everyone experiences it, but if they have a mental health history of psychosis, this can definitely make it worse.

    01:30 You can also have some issues with orthostatic hypotension.

    01:33 Remember, if you're going from lying to sitting, or sitting to standing, you want to do that slowly, so your body can acclimate.

    01:43 Now, the eighth family is the sodium-glucose co-transporters 2s.

    01:48 Remember, we're kind of excited about these because research is starting to support that these don't only help type 2 diabetics, they might be very helpful with the type 1 diabetics.

    01:58 We'll not replace insulin, but it might really help them have more effective treatment plans.

    02:04 Okay.

    02:05 This may be something that you weren't really aware of, because a lot of people are surprised to learn that the kidneys are -- really play an important role in helping to maintain the glucose balance in the body.

    02:15 See, they decide what to filter and reabsorb, especially with glucose.

    02:20 So the SGLTs -- remember, that's what it's in our name -- they're the transporters.

    02:26 They have the majority of the responsibility of reabsorbing the glucose.

    02:30 So if we block their action, what do you think's going to happen? SGLT-2 inhibitors block the reabsorption of glucose.

    02:39 So, if it blocks the reabsorption of glucose back into the body, it's going to leave the body in the urine.

    02:45 So you're going to have a lot more glucose leaving in the urine, and a lot more calories.

    02:50 That's a cool side effect.

    02:52 Now, we use it with type 2 patients and there's ongoing issues of research with type 1 patients.

    02:58 So remember, I keep bringing that up because it's such a cool development.

    03:03 So, these medications help -- they block the action so glucose is not reabsorbed.

    03:08 You pee it out in your urine.

    03:11 Okay.

    03:11 Remember that we've got a lot more glucose leaving the body through the urine, so you'll end up with a risk for orthostatic hypotension.

    03:19 Now because of that extra sugar or glucose in your urine, that environment becomes really friendly to fungus, so you're at a risk for fungal infections, for females, in particular.

    03:30 Also at risk for UTIs -- urinary tract infections -- and polyuria; having to go to the bathroom a lot.

    03:38 So this one has some very unusual side effects.

    03:42 Just try to remember that more glucose leaves the body through the urine, and that's why we end up with orthostatic hypotension, a risk for a fungal infections, UTIs, and polyuria.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Dopamine Agonist and SGLT-2 Inhibitors – Oral Antidiabetic Medications (Nursing) by Rhonda Lawes is from the course Endocrine Medications (Nursing).


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Reverse the drive of the hypothalamus to raise blood sugar, free fatty acids, and triglycerides.
    2. Increase the drive of the hypothalamus to lower blood sugar, free fatty acids, and triglycerides.
    3. Reverse the drive of the pituitary to raise blood sugar, free fatty acids, and triglycerides.
    4. Increase the drive of the pituitary to lower blood sugar, free fatty acids, and triglycerides.
    1. Exacerbation of psychosis in a client with a history of mental illness
    2. New onset of psychosis in a client without a history of mental illness
    3. Panic attacks for a client with a history of depression
    4. Worsening depressive symptoms in a client with depression
    1. Orthostatic hypotension
    2. Migraines
    3. Neck pain
    4. Mycotic infections
    5. Polyuria

    Author of lecture Dopamine Agonist and SGLT-2 Inhibitors – Oral Antidiabetic Medications (Nursing)

     Rhonda Lawes

    Rhonda Lawes


    Customer reviews

    (1)
    5,0 of 5 stars
    5 Stars
    5
    4 Stars
    0
    3 Stars
    0
    2 Stars
    0
    1  Star
    0