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Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors – Oral Antidiabetic Medications (Nursing)

by Rhonda Lawes

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      Slides 07-05 DiabeticMedications III Oral Antidiabetics and Non-Insulin SubQ.pdf
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    00:01 Our fifth family are the alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, okay? These names just keep getting longer and longer.

    00:10 But let's start with a fun question.

    00:12 What is borborygmus? All right? What is borborygmus? The answer? Those are those weird stomach noises and rumbling, and that's one of the bizarre side effects of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors.

    00:33 So, alpha-glucosidase is an enzyme that breaks down carbohydrates into monosaccharides.

    00:39 So, in a healthy body, that's what alpha-glucosidase does.

    00:43 It's an enzyme.

    00:44 And when I eat a carbohydrate, it has to be broken down into monosaccharides, so I can use it.

    00:49 Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors work in the intestines and they delay the dietary carbohydrate absorption.

    00:58 So, that's where those weird noises come from.

    01:01 Anytime you start messing with the digestive process, you're going to get some weird things.

    01:07 If I have delayed carbohydrates, it's going to end up with bacterial fermentation.

    01:13 Might be another source of those weird stomach noises.

    01:18 So, what do we use these guys for? Well, we can use them by themselves.

    01:22 There's no risk for hypoglycemia.

    01:25 Wait a minute.

    01:26 What other medications have we discussed that have a risk of hypoglycemia? See if you can write that note in your margin now.

    01:40 We can also use these with combination therapy, but now when we add these drugs in like insulin or sulfonylureas, because those drugs do have a risk of low blood sugar, now your patient is at risk for low blood sugar.

    01:55 Now, this is just an extra side for you, to help you kind of remember, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, we make the "G" and the "I" really big to help you remember, we can have some liver issues, those weird stomach noises.

    02:09 We can also have problems with iron.

    02:12 Now, long-term high-dose therapy, you might have reversible damage to that liver, okay? We might be able to fix it once you're off it.

    02:19 So, you're going to see that effect, the problem with your liver, the higher the dose and your longer that you're on it.

    02:25 Those weird, GI stomach noises, you'll likely see that in the beginning of the doses.

    02:30 So we don't widely use this drug in the United States, but we wanted you to be aware of it.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors – Oral Antidiabetic Medications (Nursing) by Rhonda Lawes is from the course Endocrine Medications (Nursing).


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. They delay the breakdown of carbohydrates into monosaccharides and thus delay dietary absorption and digestion.
    2. They delay the breakdown of proteins into monosaccharides and thus delay dietary absorption and digestion.
    3. They enhance the breakdown of carbohydrates into monosaccharides and thus delay dietary absorption and digestion.
    4. They delay the breakdown of carbohydrates into polysaccharides and thus enhance dietary absorption and digestion.
    1. Borborygmus, hepatotoxicity, and anemia due to iron malabsorption
    2. Nausea/vomiting, tachycardia, and hypotension
    3. Hypoglycemia, renal insufficiency, and bloating
    4. Borborygmus, bone fragility, and hypotension

    Author of lecture Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors – Oral Antidiabetic Medications (Nursing)

     Rhonda Lawes

    Rhonda Lawes


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