Lectures

Vasculature – Large Intestine

by James Pickering, PhD
(1)

Questions about the lecture
My Notes
  • Required.
Save Cancel
    Learning Material 2
    • PDF
      Slides 06 Abdominal and Pelvic Anatomy Pickering.pdf
    • PDF
      Download Lecture Overview
    Report mistake
    Transcript

    00:01 So if we look at the vasculature of the large intestine we can see that the large intestine is really important. It's what know as what is known as the watershed organ. It has a contribution from two main branches of the abdominal aorta.

    00:19 So we can see that the arterial supply to the large intestine comes from the superior and the inferior mesenteric arteries. Here we can see we have the superior mesenteric artery coming from about L1 from the abdominal aorta.

    00:35 And here we can see we have the inferior mesenteric artery coming from about L3.

    00:41 So LM, superior mesenteric artery comes from L1 and the inferior mesenteric artery comes from about L3. We will explore this in little more detail in a later session, later lecture. Essentially coming from these mesenteric arteries: your superior and your inferior mesenteric artery.

    01:01 Our series of colic arteries: ileocolic which heads towards the ileocecal junction with right colic, middle colic, left colic. And these all branch away ileocolic, right colic and middle colic. And we see that passing away from their respective stem, the superior mesenteric artery in this case or the left colic artery here from the inferior mesenteric artery.

    01:24 We have sigmoid arteries coming down towards the sigmoid colon. These are spreading out and fanning out towards the ascending transverse descending and sigmoid parts of the large intestine.

    01:38 We can see here, we have a very important anastomosis. We have a continuation of the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric artery.

    01:49 So blood will be coming in this direction from the superior mesenteric artery and blood will be coming in this direction from the inferior mesenteric artery. So what we have is this region around here in this upper left quadrant by the spleen we have a transition where this region is supplied by both the superior and the inferior mesenteric artery. And this is really important. It forms what's known as the marginal artery which runs around this aspect, this upper left quadrants by the spleen or the large intestine. And it is important if the inferior mesenteric artery was to be occluded. So we can imagine if the inferior mesenteric artery was occluded due to atherosclerosis in the region near the inferior mesenteric artery, then blood wouldn't be able to pass towards this descending sigmoid part of the colon. However the presence of this marginal artery means the blood can actually root itself around in this direction via the superior mesenteric artery, via the middle colic artery and then being continuous with branches of the left colic.

    02:59 So there wouldn't be any serious deficit if there was a block. We will explore this in later lectures in a bit more detail.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Vasculature – Large Intestine by James Pickering, PhD is from the course Abdomen.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Left colic.
    2. Middle colic.
    3. Right colic.
    4. Ileocolic.
    5. Inferior pancreaticoduodenal.
    1. L3.
    2. T10.
    3. T8.
    4. T12.
    5. L1.
    1. Middle colic.
    2. Gastroduodenal.
    3. Right colic.
    4. Splenic.
    5. Ileocolic.

    Author of lecture Vasculature – Large Intestine

     James Pickering, PhD

    James Pickering, PhD


    Customer reviews

    (1)
    5,0 of 5 stars
    5 Stars
    5
    4 Stars
    0
    3 Stars
    0
    2 Stars
    0
    1  Star
    0