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Uterus: Broad Ligament – Female Reproductive Organs

by James Pickering, PhD
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    00:00 So now let's move on to the uterus and specifically the broad ligament. Now the broad ligament is essentially a peritoneal ligament. And because it is a peritoneal ligament, it has those two layers.

    00:16 And it's a consequence of the peritoneum draping down over the pelvic organs. Now the uterus projects from within the pelvis, it can actually project slightly into the greater pelvis. And as the peritoneum is draping down, it covers both the anterior and the posterior surface of the uterus.

    00:40 So we can see we will have peritoneum running down what is this posterior surface of the uterus. This is the posterior view.

    00:46 So we will have peritoneum running down on this side. And we will also have peritoneum running down on the more anterior side.

    00:53 So where the lateral margin of the uterus finishes; so where the lateral marginal of the uterus finishes here and here, the peritoneum laterally comes together to form this sheet.

    01:10 The peritoneum comes together to form this sheet. And it’s this double layer of peritoneum either side of the uterus that is the broad ligament.

    01:19 It is draping down from these structures. This is your uterine tube here.

    01:24 And your uterine tube here. It is hanging down from this uterine tube.

    01:30 So if I was the broad ligament, if I personally was the uterus, and my arms could be the uterine tubes, then if a sheet was put over me, then it lay down my anterior and posterior parts of my uterus. But it also drape down like a table cloth from the uterine tube. And as it's draping down these two layers are pushed together. And these two layers together which we can see here and here is the broad ligament.

    02:00 This peritoneal ligament that helps to stabilize the uterus.

    02:08 The uterus itself is a hollow organ. It has thick walls and it’s found mostly in the lesser pelvis. The fundus can sometimes creep up into the greater pelvis. So we can see it has a nice body here.

    02:22 It has an neck which is continuous with the cervix and that's form a connection with the vagina.

    02:30 And we can see this fundus at the top here and then projecting via laterally we have the uterine tubes. As I have mentioned the body lays between two layers of peritoneum and laterally they unite to form the broad ligament.

    02:49 The broad ligament itself can be divided into three specific ligaments called the mesovarium, the mesosalpinx and the mesometrium and we can see these on the diagram. So what we are looking at? We got our uterus here. We got our fundus. Here we can see our uterine tubes.

    03:11 And the portion of the uterine tube that is covered by peritoneum.

    03:15 So uterine tube, covered by the peritoneum, that piece of peritoneum we called the mesosalpinx. So this sheet which we can see running here. This is our mesosalpinx. And this specific part of the broad ligament that covers the uterine tube.

    03:35 We also have a portion of the broad ligament that covers the ovary which we can see here. And this is known as the mesovarium.

    03:43 So this region that covers the ovary, the ovary attach to the posterior surface of the broad ligament is viewed on its posterior surface is known as the mesovarium.

    03:56 The remainder of the broad ligament, so this region around here, is known as the mesometrium.

    04:04 So within the broad ligament, we have three divisions, we have three parts.

    04:07 The part associated with the uterine tube is the mesosalpinx.

    04:13 The part associated with the ovary is the mesovarium.

    04:17 And the portion that is associated with the rest of the broad ligament, is the mesometrium, so three parts.

    04:26 The board ligament passes over the ovarian vessels as the suspensory ligament.

    04:32 So if we follow from the ovary here, we can see we have some ovarian blood vessels.

    04:38 Remember the ovarian arteries coming from the aorta. The ovarian vein drains into the left renal vein or they drain into the IVC.

    04:49 And these blood vessels are suspended themselves within a ligament.

    04:54 And that ligament and extension of the broad ligament laterally is known as the suspensory ligament.

    05:00 We also have some other thickenings within the broad ligament that connects various structures.

    05:08 And between the lateral wall of the uterus and the ovary, we find we have the ligaments of the ovary.

    05:14 So here we have got the uterus, here we have got the ovary. Running between the ovary and the uterus we have the ovarian ligament which we can see here, the ovarian ligaments or the ligaments of the ovary.

    05:27 We also have that portion of the broad ligament that contains a specific thickening which is... that passes to the inguinal canal.

    05:41 And that's known as the round ligament of the uterus.

    05:43 The round ligament of the uterus follows a similar path as that to the vas deference in the male and it passes laterally and then forwards heading towards the deep inguinal vein. It’s the consequence of embryological development and it follows like I said, a similar path of testes and heads towards the the deep inguinal vein and that is the round ligament of the uterus.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Uterus: Broad Ligament – Female Reproductive Organs by James Pickering, PhD is from the course Pelvis.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Suspensory ligament
    2. Mesovarium
    3. Mesometrium
    4. Mesosalpinx
    5. Transverse cervical ligament
    1. Fallopian tubes
    2. Ovary
    3. Cervix
    4. Uterus
    5. Vagina
    1. Round ligament of uterus
    2. Pubocervical ligament
    3. Tranvsverse cervical ligament
    4. Mesosalpinx
    5. Mesovarium

    Author of lecture Uterus: Broad Ligament – Female Reproductive Organs

     James Pickering, PhD

    James Pickering, PhD


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