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Rectum – Male Reproductive Organs

by James Pickering, PhD
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    00:01 So that's really all I want to say about the male reproductive organs.

    00:04 And just to finish the lecture, I just want to move onto the rectum.

    00:10 We can see the rectum here. The distal portion of the gastrointestinal tract that's in the male running posterior to the bladder.

    00:17 Here we have got the anterior aspect. We have got the pubic symphysis.

    00:20 We have got the bladder and here we can see the rectum, here is posteriorly.

    00:25 The rectum is going to pass through the pelvic diaphragm.

    00:30 It is continuous with the sigmoid colon and it joins the anal canal.

    00:36 The rectum begins at the rectosigmoid junction and this occurs anterior to the third sacral vertebra (S3).

    00:44 At this point the taena coli that have existed around the sigmoid colon, combine to form a continuous longitudinal layer and there is no omental appendices. We don't find those but we find them in the other parts of the colon.

    01:01 The rectum is located posterior to the seminal vesicles, the ductus deferens and the bladder.

    01:06 But there are some important peritoneal relations of the rectum.

    01:10 And we can divide the rectum into three.

    01:13 If we look here we can see that we have the superior third. We have the middle third and we have this inferior third of the rectum.

    01:24 We can see the superior third has peritoneum on both its anterior and its lateral sides.

    01:30 So the peritoneum is on the anterior and lateral surface.

    01:34 The middle third, this one here, we can just see we have peritoneum on its anterior surface.

    01:41 And then the inferior third we have no covering of peritoneal peritoneum and its actually what's knows as the subperitoneal and that's this region down here. So we can how the rectum has different peritoneal coverings along its course.

    01:58 Here we have opened up the rectum. We can see we will have the sigmoid colon up here and we can now see we have this continuous longitudinal muscle layer. We don't have those taeina coli.

    02:10 And we can see that it extends all the way to the skin where we have the anal opening.

    02:15 And here we can find where we have got the anus. The circled ano-rectal junction.

    02:21 And I will come to the ano-rectal junction in more detail when we look at the perineum in a later lecture. But I just want to concentrate on the rectum really itself. That part above the ano-rectal junction.

    02:34 There are internal folds, internal transverse folds are present. These are superior, intermediate and inferior rectal folds. We can see them passing in to the lumen of the rectum here and these are important as they form a shelf like structures.

    02:53 That's support the faeces passing through the rectum. They help to prevent the faeces from just sliding away.

    03:02 We also have a dilated portion of the rectum, the rectal ampulla.

    03:07 And that's important because it can dilate.

    03:08 It's positioned above the pelvic diaphragm.

    03:11 So the rectal ampulla in this region here is above the pelvic diaphragm.

    03:17 And its a place where the faeces can be stored prior to defaecation. It's able to relax and distend.

    03:22 So it will accommodate the presence of the faeces.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Rectum – Male Reproductive Organs by James Pickering, PhD is from the course Pelvis.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. S3
    2. S1
    3. S2
    4. L5
    5. L4
    1. Anterior
    2. Posterior
    3. Lateral
    4. Medial
    5. Inferior
    1. Rectal ampulla
    2. Superior third
    3. Middle third
    4. Inferior third
    5. Recto-sigmoid part

    Author of lecture Rectum – Male Reproductive Organs

     James Pickering, PhD

    James Pickering, PhD


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